Sun, Sunspots, Solar Flares

Jensen Ford Period 6

The Sun

The sun is in the heart of the solar system. The Sun is the largest object in the galaxy. In fact it can hold about 1 million earths inside of it. The temperature of the sun is 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit (5,500 degrees Celsius) while temperatures in the core of the sun reach 27 million F (15 million C).

It orbits some 25,000 light-years from the galactic core, completing a revolution once every 250 million years or so.

The sun was born about 4.6 billion years ago. The sun lies 93 million miles from Earth.

SunSpots

A spot or patch appearing from time to time on the sun's surface, appearing dark by contrast with its surroundings. They are cooler regions that cap some of the intense energy below them.At temperatures of 3,800 kelvins (6,380 degrees Fahrenheit or 3,527 degrees Celsius), sunspot temperatures are nearly 2,000 K (3,140 F / 1,727 C) less than the rest of the sun.Sunspots do not appear in random locations. They tend to be concentrated in two mid-latitude bands on either side of the equator. They begin appearing around 25 to 30 degrees north and south of the center. Sunspots tend to cluster in bands above and below the equator, results from the interaction of suns surface plasma with it magnetic field. Sunspots do not appear in random locations. They tend to be concentrated in two mid-latitude bands on either side of the equator. New sunspots appear closer to the equator and the older ones appear at the average of 5 to 10 degrees.

Solar Flares

Solar flares are a brief eruption of intense high-energy radiation from the sun's surface, associated with sunspots and causing electromagnetic disturbances on the earth, as with radio frequency communications and power line transmissions.Temperatures in the outer layer of the sun, known as the corona typically fall around a few million kelvins.Because solar flares form in the same active regions as sunspots, they are connected to these smaller, less violent events. Flares tend to follow the same 11-year cycle. From a constant stream of particles in the form of solar wind to the unpredictable bombardment from solar flare, earth often feels the the effects of its stellar companions.
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