RESOLUTION

Word of the Week

RESOLUTION

res·o·lu·tion

noun \ˌre-zə-ˈlü-shən\


: the act of finding an answer or solution to a conflict, problem, etc.


: the act of resolving something


: an answer or solution to something


: the ability of a device to show an image clearly and with a lot of detail

Full Definition of RESOLUTION

1 : the act or process of resolving: as


a : the act of analyzing a complex notion into simpler ones


b : the act of answering : solving


c : the act of determining


d : the passing of a voice part from a dissonant to a consonant tone or the progression of a chord from dissonance to consonance


e : the separating of a chemical compound or mixture into its constituents


f (1) : the division of a prosodic element into its component parts (2) : the substitution in Greek or Latin prosody of two short syllables for a long syllable


g : the analysis of a vector into two or more vectors of which it is the sum


2 : the subsidence of a pathological state (as inflammation)


3

a : something that is resolved <made a resolution to mend my ways>


b : firmness of resolve


4 : a formal expression of opinion, will, or intent voted by an official body or assembled group


5 : the point in a literary work at which the chief dramatic complication is worked out


6

a : the process or capability of making distinguishable the individual parts of an object, closely adjacent optical images, or sources of light


b : a measure of the sharpness of an image or of the fineness with which a device (as a video display, printer, or scanner) can produce or record such an image usually expressed as the total number or density of pixels in the image <a resolution of 1200 dots per inch>

Examples of RESOLUTION

  1. a court for the resolution of civil disputes
  2. We found a resolution to the dispute.
  3. computer screens with high resolutions
  4. The monitor has excellent resolution.
  5. In June, the demagogic militia leader Moqtada al Sadr … sponsored a resolution requiring the government to seek permission of the parliament before asking the U.N. to reauthorize the presence of foreign forces in Iraq. —Lawrence Wright, New Yorker, 22 Oct. 2007