The world wouldn't be the same

without Cordell Hull

Early Life

Cordell Hull was an American politician from the U.S. state of Tennessee. He is best known as the longest serving Secretary of State holding the position for 11 years (1933–1944) in the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt during much of World War II. Hull received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 for his role in establishing the United Nations, and was referred to by President Roosevelt as the "Father of the United Nations.

United Nations

The United Nations (UN) is an intergovermental organization established on 24 October 1945 to promote international co-operation. A replacement for the ineffective League of Nations, the organization was created following the Second World War to prevent another such conflict. At its founding, the UN had 51 member states; there are now 193.

Cordell Hull

was born on 2 of October 1871 in in Olympus, Pickett County, Tennessee. From 1903 to 1907, Hull served as a local judge, later he was elected to the United States House of Representatives where he served 11 terms (1907–1921 and 1923–1931) totaling 22 years. After his defeat in 1920, he served as chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

Death

He died on July 23, 1955, at age 83, at his home in Washington, D.C., after a lifelong struggle with familial remitting-relapsing sarcoidosis (often confused with tuberculosis) and is buried in the vault of the Chapel of St. Joseph of Arimathea in the Washington Nationala Cathedral.