CCSD Elementary Coaches

February Curriculum At-A-Glance

E/LA

In Q3, what are our students doing in writing?

Vertical conversations are important for teachers to investigate and review a continuum of understandings expected in grade level work. Shared for teachers is a K-5 vertical look at the Q3 opinion writing standards.


ELACCKW1

In Kindergarten, students are using a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose opinion pieces in which they tell a reader the topic or the name of the book they are “writing” about and state an opinion or preference about the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is…).


ELACC1W1:

In first grade, students are writing opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or the name of the book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and provide some sense of closure.


ELACC2W1

In second grade, students are writing opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.


ELACC3W1

In third grade, students are writing opinion pieces on topics or text and supporting a point of view with reasons. Included in these understandings are the following elements:

a. Introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.

b. Provide reasons that support the opinion.

c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.

d. Provide a concluding statement or section.


ELACC4W1

In fourth grade, students are writing opinion pieces on topics or texts and supporting a point of view with reasons. Included in these understandings are the following elements:

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.

c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition).

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented


ELACC5W1

In fifth grade, students are writing opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. Included in these understandings are the following elements:

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose.

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details.

c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically).

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.

Teaching Sight Words/High Frequency Words Effectively

Have you ever wondered how children actually learn so many words so quickly? This module describes the research on sight word/high frequency word development and provides a very simple procedure that you can use to hone your large-group instruction and target your small-group instruction. Contact Kelly to come share this important PL with your teachers on developing word recognition.

PARCC ELA/Literacy Practice Tests

Portal for all the resources available to states and districts administering the PARCC Assessment. Click here.

How can you help your teachers engage students in comprehending extended text? Revisited

Reading extended text can be problematic for some students. Using Comprehension Coding, students mark codes to indicate what they are thinking as they read. Students don't need to mark every sentence. They select those sentences for which a code is appropriate. As students engage in texts to respond to written constructed responses, share this strategy during grade level PL sessions.



The following codes are recommended:


! This is important.

I knew that.

x This is different from what I thought.

? I don't understand.

Math

WHAT ARE OUR STUDENTS DOING IN MATH?

Kindergarten students are adding and subtracting.
  • They will add and subtract within 10 using multiple representations.
  • They will compose and decompose numbers less than or equal to 10.


First Grade students are continuing their investigation of addition and subtraction.

Second Grade students are adding and subtracting within 1000 and preparing to study geometry!


Third Grade students are finishing their study of area and perimeter and preparing to study fractions.


Fourth Grade students are operating with fractions.

  • Students will add fractions with like denominators through an understanding of composing and decomposing a fraction.
  • Students will multiply fractions by whole numbers.
  • This unit is a great opportunity to highlight how models of addition and multiplication of whole numbers can also be applied to fractions.
  • Students she be exposed to multiple fraction models (partitions, number lines, sets)
  • Moving into February, students will begin using what they know about fractions to make sense of decimals.
  • They will compare decimals to hundredths, use decimal notation for tenths and hundredths and recognize the relationship between decimals and fractions.


Fifth Grade students are finishing their study of fractions and beginning to study the coordinate plane.

  • Students will identify patterns formed by numerical rules and describe relationships between those patterns. (Think of SMPs here)
  • They will plot points in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane.
  • As we move into the unit on the coordinate plane, teachers should identify ways to keep fraction skills fresh.

Are your teachers frustrated by differentiation?

In January, James Delisle published an article in Education Week entitled Differentiation Doesn't Work. Many teachers saw the article and felt it resonated with them.


Since then Carol Ann Tomlinson, Grant Wiggins, and Jay McTighe have all weighed in and published responses to the article (Tomlinson in Education Week and the others through other platforms). If you are looking for a way to start a conversation in your building about differentiation, this would be a great place to start.

Georgia Milestones EOG Assessment Guides

These Assessment Guides are provided to acquaint Georgia educators and other stakeholders with the structure and content assessed on the End of Grade (EOG) measures. These guides are not intended to substitute for the state-adopted content standards. The guides are a supplemental resource and are provided to complement, not replace, other instructional resources developed by the local school district or the example resources provided by the Curriculum and Instruction Division of the Georgia Department of Education. In principle, the EOG Assessment Guides are intended to be descriptive of the assessment program and should not be considered all-inclusive.


EOG Assessment Guides

YOUNG GEORGIA AUTHORS IS BACK!

Writing competitions encourage students to develop writing that represents their best efforts. Schools can celebrate the writing process by reaching the publishing stage with students. Young Georgia Authors' competition is one opportunity you can provide to promote writing in your students and school. I encourage you to submit student work from your school to heighten the level of awareness for good writing.


Young GA Authors Information


Young GA Authors Rule Book

Science

CCSD Elementary Young Scientist Fair

Saturday, March 21st, 8:30am

Alps Road Elementary School

Come and join us for a day of science competitions, hands-on science activities, demonstrations, and presentations.


*Event registration will close on Friday, March 6, 2015.


More event and registration information can be found at http://bit.ly/CCSD_YSF.

Picture Perfect Science Kits Are Available for Checkout

Are your teachers interested in using a Picture Perfect Science Lesson? Do they have the books they need? Do they have the materials they need? Picture Perfect Science kits for the following lessons are available for check out. To check out a kit, contact Amy Peacock @ peacocka@clarke.k12.ga.us.


  • Over in the Ocean
  • Sunshine on My Shoulders
  • Be a Friend to Trees
  • Roller Coasters
  • If You Find a Rock
  • That Magnetic Dog
  • Oil Spill
  • Mirror, Mirror
  • Day and Night
  • Changing Moon
  • Sheep in a Jeep
  • Bugs
  • Grand Canyon
  • Name that Shell
  • Batteries Included
  • Chemical Change Cafe