Ancient Rome FAQs

Flora Darling

Writing

Writing in Ancient Rome was very different from how we write now. The Romans used papyrus for paper. The papyrus plant was a reed that grew along the Nile, whose stalks, when cut and layered in crisscross patterns on top of each other, would dry into stiff, yet pliable, sheets. These sheets were hard to break but also were very useful for writing. For writing they used a quill feather dipped in ink. This was used as a writing utensil on the papyrus. Writing was mainly used for talking to people. Writing was a very way to communicate with people.
Big image

Family

A Roman family was very different from the modern family. Roman families had slaves, but they included the slaves into their family. The slaves were treated like family if they lived in your home. The head of the family is the oldest father alive. They choose most of the decisions that you make and they are in charge of everything. Most Roman families included a mother, father, children, and slaves. The mother didn't have as many rights as the husband. When trying for children they hoped for boys so they could carry on the family name. Having children was a blessing to families. They thought it was a blessing from god when you had children. When you did not have children it was a thought that you were cursed. If you lived in the same household as a family you were considered their family.

Roman names are very different from modern names. When given a name it had more meaning and importance. Names were given because they were supposed to carry on the families name but also have lots of meaning. Before they used to be very complex names but overtime they became more simple. Romans had two names Nomen and praenomen. Nomen stands for social rank and it was very important to have a high social rank. When owners have slaves they choose their names. When your name ended in ius, it means you are more prestigious. When your name ended in acus it means you are less prestigious.

Big image

Clothing- Men's and Boys'

"A perizoma is an undergarment that both men and women wear. A loincloth passes between their legs and around their waist or hips. The chiton was a large rectangle of material folded once and sewn together along the edge opposite the fold to form a tube. A man’s chiton was stitched across the top, with holes for the head and arms." Men wore a robe or cloak called a himation. Only free male citizens at the age of 16 could wear a certain toga. The social class depended on what you could wear. If you were a free citizen you would wear different clothes from a non free citizen. Roman boys wore jewelry. They wore a signet ring or a locket. Which contained an amulet. The amulet was worn to ward off evil.

Roman women wore a toga over a tunic. They would always be purple as well. They would also always have their hair nicely braided and it would always be tight. Woman would wear a tunica rectal before a wedding. After a girl hits puberty she puts off her toga praetexta. Roman women that were married wore a stola. Disgraced women would only wear a plane white toga. People with different social classes would wear something different from high class women.

(Below is a picture of the toga the men would wear)

Big image

Citations

"Books and Manuscripts." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 98-100. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"The Nature of the Family." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 324-325. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

"The Dress of Roman Women." Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. Ed. Edward I. Bleiberg, et al. Vol. 2: Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.C.E.-476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 106-109. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.

McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.