ALWAYS A STAR, ALWAYS A DREAMER

WORDS FROM HONORABLE FREDERIC T. GREENHALGE Vol. 1

I BELIEVE...

In a speech at Lowell, October 4, he said: "We have what may be called, and what seems to us, an unexampled prosperity. A we hear the song of the mills, the sound of the engine, the ringing of the anvils, it seems that we have the right to believe, and I believe it right to believe, that Lowell is one of the richest jewels in that diadem of prosperous cities with which the genius of our industrial system has crowned the brow of America."

A WORD FROM HONORABLE GREENHALGE: THE MIND IS A STAR - V.2

"We speak of the human mind as finite...as the spaces of the sky. As in those spaces we are ever discovering a new star,...in the infinite spaces of the mind." - FTG, 3.11.1883

A WORD FROM HONORABLE GREENHALGE: I BELIEVE IN THE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS - V.3

"I am to speak of 'Journalism and its Opportunities.' Journalism is an art, it is also a science; and it has much to do with all arts and sciences. In fact, it is the mirror of all arts and sciences. It is the panorama of all the progress of all the world. Its agents and servants are steam, electricity, mechanics, and every branch of human knowledge and invention; and every forward step made in any art or science, in knowledge or invention, every improvements in steam, electricity, mechanics, --- each and all are reflected and repeated in journalism...[Mr. Greenhalge goes on to compare early newsprint as a rarity, a newspaper was cherished like a bible and over fifty years it has gone from scarcity to a daily bread and] ...no longer a luxury, but a necessity of life, like fuel or light; a necessity in every family, and a power in every nation, --- guiding, checking, and inspiring the thoughts and action of millions, in business, politics, arts, education, and morals. Here, then is a stupendous power, and upon the whole a power wielded with intelligence and beneficence."

"Journalism is the brightening living record of the day's doings in action and thought --- catching glimpse of the 'Cynthia of the minute,.....Journalism is the first flash of the daylight of truth, of fact or opinion."

"To establish and maintain a great journal is a noble and difficult task [Mr. Greenhalge contrasts the balance like a ying and yang. Then continues to emphasize the importance of setting boundaries as to not encroach on the others specialty]. "They must be kept apart as sacredly as the Constitution keeps apart the executive, the legislative, and the judicial departments of the government. Newspapers must be the mouthpieces of principle, not of the highest bidder; the spirit of truth, and not of subsidy."

"Journalists are the uncrowned sovereigns of republics; their power is as absolute as that of justice and honor....The journalist is accepted by the people, except when he plays the lobbyist, the speculator, or the quack." If he is ever dethroned, it is by his own act, his own abdication. The true journalist is a man of high and inflexible purpose; no more than the gladiator can he yield to debauchery or folly." - FTG, PRESS CLUB OF LOWELL SPEECH - 3.1893, p.136 - 138.

A WORD FROM HONORABLE GREENHALGE: AS MAYOR, SEES LOWELL AS A DEMOCRATIC PLACE - V.4

"Lowell was then, as it is now, in many ways a 'very democratic place.' In all parts of the great democracy of America, the continued counting of votes and the frequent announcement that ' Blank appears to have the majority, ' tends, doubtless, to perfect equality. The king is not made by birth, but by votes. Still there is not a hamlet in the world where there is not a 'ruling class.' That class may maintaining itself by majorities of all the votes cast or by military might, but it will maintain itself until the millennium. Lowell was found by a few strong men. They build huge mills controlled by a dozen incorporated companies. These 'corporations' were united closely in order to control the water power, and doubtless for other good purposes...In the early days of Lowell the managers of these mills managed the people who worked for them. They managed them prudently, wisely, and for those days benevolently. They managed the schools, they managed the churches, they managed Lowell." - FTG, p. 150



SPEECH AT LOWELL, 10.4


"We have what may be called, and what seems to us, an unexampled prosperity. as we hear the song of the mills, the sound of the engine, the ringing of the anvils, it seems that we have the right to believe, and I believe it right to believe, that Lowell is one of the richest jewels in that diadem of prosperous cities with which the genius of our industrial system has crowned the brow of America." p. 178



CONGRESSIONAL CAREER SPEECH REPUBLICAN CITY CONVENTION TO NOMINATE A CANDIDATE FOR MAYOR, 11.27


"The great national contest which has just ended, and the glorious and shining results spread before us, is of no consequence to us unless our local self-government is attended to. The government of your own....home, and your own city is of as much importance as the government of your State and Nation; for it is here you are to build up the nation."

A WORD FROM HONORABLE GREENHALGE: SECOND TERM AS MAYOR, STANDS FOR LOWELL'S PUBLIC SCHOOLS - V5

EXCERPTS FROM FTG'S TWO INAUGURAL SPEECHES : ---


"The instruction of our youth gives us a security and peace beyond anything that law or police can give. These are the external armor of the body politic. Education is the very breath of life."

" The education of the people, then, must be the first object of public concern; here in lies the very safety of the Commonwealth. 'Salus citatis es suprema lex.' " p. 161


Throughout his two terms, Mr. Greenhalge advocated for Lowell's publicly educated children. He argued for adequate funding for the building of The Green School across from Pollard Memorial Library, funding to build a new high school, a new City Hall, and free textbooks into the hands of our children.


EXCERPTS FROM HIS LETTER TO THE PUPILS OF THE SCHOOLS OF LOWELL : MAYOR'S OFFICE, LOWELL, MASS., 9.21.1881: ---


"Scholars, in James Abram Garfield you have a product of our institutions, of our education, our civilization, --- a perfect type of the citizen of the American Republic...[such a man] should be enshrined in the loving hearts of youth and childhood." p. 162