Bioethics

Why Bio-Engineering is a good thing

Thesis

Bio-engineering is a necessary benefit to the scientific community through its procedures, application, and medical advancements.

Applied Science

There would be no point to experimentation if it was never applied. Through bio-engineering, many scientific wonders have been created and/or sustained.

  • Genetically Engineered Dogs - Cure for Parkinson's? (Heilpern 1)
  • Cloning has been used to keep species from extinction
  • "The new FDA guidelines adopted in 2008 declared meat and milk from cloned livestock to be as safe as that from non-cloned animals." (Lerner 2).

Procedures Behind Bioethics

The procedures behind Bioethics are very detailed and take many years to perfect. When an experiment proves successful, it is another step to a better healthier Earth.
  • How we clone animals
  • GloFish exist and are not in pain
Dolly the cloned Sheep Video-->

Medicine

The medical field has benefited greatly from Genetic Engineering. New medicines have been created and are becoming more readily available.

  • Animals can be genetically modified to painlessly produce things that are needed in medicine
  • The process being developed through the bio-engineering of dogs could help prevent muscular dystrophy and Parkinson's disease (Heilpern 2).
  • Pig organs can be modified to use as transplants for humans
  • Artificially created "mini organs" can be and are being used to test new medicines on (Towards a body 1).

Misconceptions

There are many misconceptions when it comes to Bioethics. People assume it is all a terrible evil when in reality, it does a lot of good.

  • Capitalism and other competitive motivators could lead genetic-engineering in higher-order animals
  • The United Nations has urged its member nations to enact such bans to preserve human dignity and protect women's health
  • Large problem is that bioethicists's are not engaged in global issues
  • The use of GM animals in experiments now could prevent the future use of animal testing in the future
  • Can a GM organism be considered alive?

Works Cited

Aldridge, Susan. "Transgenic Animals." Biotechnology: In Context. Ed. Brenda Wilmoth Lerner and K. Lee Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2012. In Context Series. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


Brudney, Daniel. "Losing dignity." Perspectives in Biology and Medicine Summer 2009: 454+. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


"GM pig organs could soon be transplanted into humans; A major hurdle in transplanting pig organs into humans has been overcome by Harvard University scientists." Telegraph Online 12 Oct. 2015. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


Koth, Philip Edward. "GloFish®." Biotechnology: In Context. Ed. Brenda Wilmoth Lerner and K. Lee Lerner. Detroit: Gale, 2012. N. pag. In Context Ser. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


Lerner, K. Lee. "Animal cloning." The Gale Encyclopedia of Science. Ed. K. Lee Lerner and Brenda Wilmoth Lerner. 5th ed. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2014. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


Lolis, Thomas. "'You're forever stuck in neutral, manmeat': hobbesian biopolitics and the rise of the Transhuman." Forum for World Literature Studies 3.3 (2011): 323+. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


"Pro-Life Official Hails Reintroduction of Genuine Cloning Ban." Science Letter 17 Apr. 2007: 332. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


"Super-strong, genetically-engineered dogs -- Could they cure Parkinson's disease?" CNN Wire 28 Oct. 2015. Student Resources in Context. Web. 11 Nov. 2015.


Thilmany, Jean. "Engineering human health." Mechanical Engineering-CIME Dec. 2013: 18+. Student Resources in Context. Web. 12 Nov. 2015.


"Towards a body-on-a-chip; Bioengineering." The Economist 13 June 2015: 75(US). Student Resources in Context. Web. 13 Nov. 2015.