stomach cancer

prevention

What is Stomach Cancer?

Stomach cancer, also known as gastric cancer, is a cancer of the stomach. This often refers to the type of stomach cancer in which the tumor develops on the inside lining of the stomach, which is adenocarcinoma (Stomach Cancer). Stomach cancer tends to develop slowly over a number of years, and the earliest stages usually go undetected (What is Stomach Cancer?).


There are a few ways stomach cancer spreads. It can grow on the stomach's walls and then invade nearby organs. It can also spread to nearby lymph nodes, which are "bean-sized structures that help fight infections." Once it has spread a bit farther from its source, the cancer is able to travel through the bloodstream to different organs in the body (What is Stomach Cancer?). (Eden Jung)

What to Know

Doctors are unsure of the cause of gastric (stomach) cancer. All they know are the factors that appear to contribute to the formation of the stomach tumors (Mayo Clinic Staff).

Worldwide, stomach cancer is the fourth most common cancer and the second most leading cause of cancer-related deaths (About Gastric Cancer). (Ashley Hendricks)

Survival Rates

The five-year survival rate (survival rate of cancer after being found after 5 years) of stomach cancer is very low. For gastric cancers diagnosed/treated before spreading, the five-year survival rate is 64%. However, if the cancer has spread far from its source, the five-year survival rate drastically lowers to 4%.

Stages of Stomach Cancer

There are five main stages of stomach cancer.


Stage 0

Although the cancer has formed, it has not spread to any nearby tissue or to the inner cells that line the stomach (Stomach Cancer Stages).


Stage I

The cancer begins spreading under the first layer of mucus in the stomach lining. It has just reached the main muscle layer. It may have begun spreading to a couple nearby lymph nodes (Stomach Cancer Stages).


Stage II

The cancer has begun spreading into the main muscle layer. The cancer may have even spread to all layers of the stomach. Up to seven lymph nodes have been affected. Although the cancer has managed to reach the outside layer of the stomach, it hasn't spread to any other organs (Stomach Cancer Stages).


Stage III

The cancer has completely affected all layers of the stomach. It has grown through the stomach wall and has begun to spread to more distant organs (Stomach Cancer Stages).


Stage IV

The cancer has spread to more distant organs, such as the brain or the liver (Stomach Cancer Stages). (Eden Jung).

Symptoms include:

  • Fatigue
  • Feeling bloated after eating
  • Persistent vomiting
  • Feeling full after eating small amounts of food
  • Severe and persistent heartburn
  • Stomach pain
  • Severe and unrelenting indigestion
  • Persistent and unexplained nausea
  • Unintentional weight loss (Stomach Cancer) (Eden Jung)

Risk Factors

The average person's risk of being diagnosed with stomach cancer is about 1 in 100. Men also have a higher chance of developing this form of cancer than women (Frequently Asked).


Although the cause of gastric cancer is unknown, risk factors include a having a diet high in salty and smoked foods, a diet low in fruits and vegetables, a family history of stomach cancer, long-term stomach inflammation, smoking (Mayo Clinic Staff), and working in coal, metal, or rubber industries (Stomach Cancer Risk Factors).


The risk of developing stomach cancer sharply increases after the age of 55, and most cases of stomach cancer are diagnosed during the patients' late 60s and 80s (What are the Risk Factors?). Those who live in Eastern Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Latin America have higher chances of developing gastric cancer (Stomach Cancer Risk Factors). Studies have also shown that in the United States, African Americans, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans are more likely to become diagnosed than non-Hispanic whites (What are the Risk Factors). (Eden Jung)

Gastric Cancer Foundation

The goal of the GCF is to help the lives of people with stomach cancer and find a cure. You should donate because there a very few thinks doctors know about stomach cancer. They have already raised hundreds of thousands of dollars that have gone to finding a cure and make people's lives better who affected by this awful cancer. (Conley)

How Can You Prevent Stomach Cancer?

Scientist don't know what causes stomach cancer. It is known though that it is linked to a bad diet and smoking. You should also always refrigerate your food. This is another reason to donate and raise awareness for stomach cancer so one day scientist may know how to prevent it.(Conley)

Treatment

Treatment options for stomach cancer are radiation, chemotherapy, and Target surgery. Early treatment can cost up to $50,000, but due to the fact that there are very few things known about it cost can go up to $200,000. The survival rate of stomach cancer is 64% if found early, but drastically goes down due to scientist knowing very little about it. Your diet is extremely strict after treatment. There are support groups such as the cancer support community that help educate and give hope to people about stomach cancer. (Conley)

why you should care

Stomach cancer is rare among northern America, but there is still a chance of getting it. Even doctors are not sure of what causes it. Since stomach cancer is uncommon is the U.S. we should know what it is and what the risks are. In other countries like southern and eastern Europe stomach cancer is more common.(entered by Ashley Hendricks)

Reflections

1. What is the survival rate?

2. What are some symptoms of stomach cancer?

3. What charity gives money to Stomach cancer?

4.What treatments are available?

5. How much do these treatments cost?

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Conley Rodgers Work Cited

Works Cited


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