The Nuremberg Laws

Alli Crabtree, 7 Period

Introduction

The Nuremberg Laws were announced by Adolf Hitler on September 15, 1935. Germany’s parliament, The Reich stag, which was made up of Nazi representatives, passed these laws. These laws changed everybody's view on what exactly a Jew was. After the laws were passed, Hitler announced them at the Nazi Party rally in Nuremberg, Germany. The Nuremberg Laws are made up of two sections, the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor, and the Reich Citizenship Law. The Nuremberg Laws changed the lives of the Jewish people in Germany. These laws are important because they shaped the description of German Jews, and Jews all over the world.

Sources for the Introduction

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Nuremberg Laws." Nuremberg Laws. USHMM, 18 Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


Bodden, Valerie. The Holocaust. Mankato, MN: Creative Education, 2008. 7-16. Print.

Source for the Pictures

The Hoosier Nuremberg Laws. Digital image. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

Parts of the Nuremberg Laws


The Nuremberg Laws are split into many different parts, but these are some of the laws.

  • The Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor is one of the most important laws created during the Holocaust. Since The Reich stag was convinced that the purity of German blood was necessary to keep the German race alive, they created this law. The Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor states that marriages or sexual relations between Jews and Germans, or Aryans, were strictly forbidden. Jews were also not allowed to employ females of German blood as servants. The Jews were also not allowed to display the national flag of Germany or the Reich flag.
  • The Reich Citizenship Law told everyone the difference between a German and a Jew, as well as what they can and can't do. A Reich citizen is a German citizen, or someone related to that blood. In order to be a Reich citizen, you must have the Reich citizenship certification. The Reich citizen has the ability to enjoy all political rights, in accordance with the law.
  • One very interesting law mentioned in the Nuremberg Laws is in article one, law one, and reads, " Marriages between Jews and citizens of Germany or kindred blood are forbidden. Marriages concluded in defiance of this law are void, even if, for the purpose of evading this law, they were concluded abroad." To make this law make more sense, it basically says, if a Jew marries, or has any sexual relations with a German, they are breaking the law. Even if the Jews had married a full blooded German long before this law, they were not allowed to be together anymore. This law tore families apart.

Sources for "Parts of the Nuremberg Laws"

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Nuremberg Laws." Nuremberg Laws. USHMM, 18 Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


"The Nuremberg Laws (This Week in Jewish History) Dr. Henry Abramson." YouTube. YouTube, 6 Nov. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


"Neither Black Nor White: Intermarried Jews and Mischlinge during the Third Reich." Nuremburg Laws., 28 Nov. 2005. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

A Timeline of the Nuremberg Laws

On July 31, 1932, Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany. In 1933, the discrimination of Jewish people began. In 1934, Jewish newspapers were no longer allowed to be sold in the streets, Jews were deprived of the status of citizenship, and also marriage,or physical relations between Jews and Aryans became forbidden. Next, on Sept. 15, 1935, the Nuremberg Laws were passed by Adolf Hitler. As of Nov. 12, 1936, Jews weren’t allowed to vote in Germany. Then on Nov. 12, 1937, Jews were not allowed to receive passports to travel out of the country. On Nov. 12, 1938, Jews had to start carrying ID cards and Jewish passports were marked with a J. Then Jews were not allowed own or bear arms. Jews may no longer run businesses and may not attend plays, concerts, etc. Then Jewish children were moved to Jewish schools. Jewish businesses are shut down, and Jews were no longer allowed to be in certain places at certain times. Jews must hand over car registrations and drivers’ licenses. Then the laws made Jews sell their businesses and hand over securities and jewels and also Jews were not allowed attend colleges. On Nov. 12, 1939, Jews had to follow curfews, and turn in all radios to the police. Also Jews must wear the yellow stars of David. Next, on Nov. 12, 1940, Jews were moved to concentration camps, and were no longer allowed to have phones. Then on Nov. 12, 1941, Jew were not allowed to use public telephones, and were not allowed to leave their homes, unless they had police permission. Finally, on Nov. 12, 1942, the last of the Jewish people's rights were taken away. They were no longer allowed to have pets, attend school, subscribe to newspapers, keep electrical equipment, own bikes, buy foods such as meats, eggs, or milk, and they weren't allowed to use any type of public transportation.

Source for " A Timeline of the Nuremberg Laws"

"Chronology of Nuremberg Laws Timeline." Timetoast., 19 Aug. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.
The Nuremberg Laws (This Week in Jewish History) Dr. Henry Abramson

Source for the Video

"The Nuremberg Laws (This Week in Jewish History) Dr. Henry Abramson." YouTube. YouTube, 6 Nov. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.

Interesting Facts

  • The Nuremberg Laws were made very hastily, and there wasn't much thought put into them.
  • Adolf Hitler was the Nazi leader who instigated these laws.
  • The Nuremberg Laws are the so called "framework" for the Holocaust.
  • These laws were passed on September 15, 1935, at the Nazi Rally in Nuremberg, Germany.
  • Since these laws were first announced at the Nazi Rally in Nuremberg, Germany, they received their name as the Nuremberg Laws.
  • Another interesting Nuremberg Law is, "Jews will not be permitted to employ female citizens of German or kindred blood as domestic servants."

Sources for the Facts

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Nuremberg Laws." Nuremberg Laws. USHMM, 18 Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


Jewish Virtual Library. "Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honor." Jan. 2016. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. "Archives Receives Original Nazi Documents That "Legalized" Persecution of Jews." July 2015. Web. 4 Feb. 2016.

Conclusion

In conclusion, The Nuremberg Laws were one of the many dominoes, in the domino effect, that lead to the Holocaust. These laws tore families and friends apart. The Nuremberg Laws not only tore people apart, but also a country. These laws are an important part of the Holocaust, because they ended up being one of the causes. The Nuremberg Laws will live on forever, and be an example of the discrimination against a race.

Works Cited

Bodden, Valerie. The Holocaust. Mankato, MN: Creative Education, 2008. 7-16. Print.


"Chronology of Nuremberg Laws Timeline." Timetoast., 19 Aug. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


"Neither Black Nor White: Intermarried Jews and Mischlinge during the Third Reich." Nuremburg Laws., 28 Nov. 2005. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


The Hoosier Nuremberg Laws. Digital image. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


"The Nuremberg Laws (This Week in Jewish History) Dr. Henry Abramson." YouTube. YouTube, 6 Nov. 2014. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.


United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Nuremberg Laws." Nuremberg Laws. USHMM, 18 Aug. 2015. Web. 28 Jan. 2016.