Project-Based Learning

Create an authentic student-driven classroom

Information taken from a PBL class presented by Dr. Judith Ray

1. DEVELOP A PROJECT IDEA

Begin with the end in mind

•Work backward from a topic.

•Use your Standards.

•Find projects and ideas on the Web.

•Map your community.

•Match what people do in their daily work.

•Tie the project to local and national events.

•Focus on community service.

2. DECIDE THE SCOPE OF THE PROJECT

PLAN

  • Duration
  • Breadth
  • Technology
  • Outreach
  • Partnership
  • Audience

PBL Sources

Don't be afraid of adapting resources!

3. SELECT STANDARDS


Key questions:

“What do you want your students to know and be able to do?”
OR

“What topics would you be embarrassed about if your students couldn’t discuss them intelligently at the end of the project?”


Be selective: do not try to meet too many standards in a short project. Three or less is best.

Literacy as a core standard: Include at least one literacy outcome in your project-along with a major product (writing, speaking).

4. INCORPORATE SIMULTANEOUS OUTCOMES

Work together in teams to discover projects to incorporate across the curriculum.


How can “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” produce simultaneous outcomes at your school?

5. WORK FROM PROJECT DESIGN CRITERIA


Does your project…

–Meet standards?

–Engage students?

–Focus on essential understanding?

–Encourage higher-level thinking?

–Reinforce basic skills?

–Demonstrate Teacher literacy

–Allow all students to succeed?

–Use clear, precise assessments?

–Require the sensible use of technology?

–Address authentic issues?

6. CREATE THE OPTIMAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

•Give your project one or more connections beyond the classroom.

•Alter your classroom’s look and feel.

•See the whole before practicing the parts.

•Study content and apply it to authentic problems.

•Make schoolwork more like real work.