Secondary English Weekly #21

VOLUME THREE, ISSUE TWENTY-ONE /March 1-5, 2021

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Monday, March 1st

Tuesday, March 2nd

  • Library Journal/School Library Journal Equity in Action: Fostering an Antiracist Library Culture-Second Session in Series 2-4PM Register Today!

  • Thurber House Young Writers' Studio for High School Students 6:30-8 PM Click Here to Register

Wednesday, March 3rd
  • StudySync Webinar: Basic Training: How to Create and Grade Assignments 4-4:30 PM — Register
  • McGraw Hill Literacy Series Creating Culturally Responsive Curriculum with Dr. Michelle Martin 4:30-5:30 PM Register HERE
  • Reading Like a Historian Institute 2: Designing and Adapting Reading Like a Historian Curriculum-First Session in Series 6-8PM Register Here
Thursday, March 4th

Saturday, March 6th

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UPDATES COMING TO ENGLISH COURSE CATALOG

For the 2021-2022 SY, there will be some additional semester elective courses added to the English Course Catalog for CCS. In addition, some courses that used to be full-year electives, will now have semester versions. These changes are an outgrowth of semesterization. The updates are in process and will be made in Infinite Campus in the next few weeks. Curriculum Maps will be updated/created this summer. You can always see the English Course Catalog at the ELA 6-12 Website by clicking on the Course Descriptions Quick Link.

MIDDLE SCHOOL UPDATES

-College/Career Ready Literacy, the Tier 2 intervention course, will have both a year-long and semester version. (This course is designed to aid any student reading two or more years below grade level in making gains toward college and career readiness. Students will engage in a systematic, specific, progressive, reading intervention program such as Achieve3000 or similar resource that uses adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. Student learning targets are set forth by the specific program with alignment to Ohio’s Learning Standards for English Language Arts.)

-Essay Writing will be added as a middle school semester elective. [Semester Course. Grades 6-8. This writing class will introduce students to the formal writing process (planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach) for informative, argumentative, and literary analysis essays. Student learning targets for English Grade 6-8 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will drive student-learning objectives.]

-English Composition, a high school semester elective, can now be offered in middle school if a teacher has 9th-grade English certification. [This semester course is intended for 9th or 10th grade, regular education students, taught by a regular education teacher. It can be taught in the middle school for a high school elective credit if teacher has 9th grade certification. This writing class will introduce high school students to the formal writing process (planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach) as well as six major types of writing (1. Express and Reflect; 2. Inform and Explain; 3. Evaluate and Judge; 4. Inquire and Explore; 5. Analyze and Interpret; 6. Take a Stand/Propose a Solution). It is modeled on Write Like This by Kelly Gallagher.]

HIGH SCHOOL UPDATES

-College/Career Ready Literacy, the Tier 2 intervention course, will have both a year-long and semester version. (This course is designed to aid any student reading two or more years below grade level in making gains toward college and career readiness. Students will engage in a systematic, specific, progressive, reading intervention program such as Achieve3000 or similar resource that uses adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. Student learning targets are set forth by the specific program with alignment to Ohio’s Learning Standards for English Language Arts.)

-Speech Communication will have two distinct semester versions with descriptive names, not just X and Y, and the full-year version will no longer be in the catalog.

  • Speech Communication [Semester Course. Grades 11-12. The study of communication in this course will include, but is not limited to, the communication process, speaking to inform (expository and process), speaking to persuade, competition speaking (impromptu, extemporaneous), and debate. Students will read, discuss, and respond in writing and orally to the informational and literary texts and they will be developing and delivering numerous (10+) speeches and presentations. The goals of this course are to help students understand the communication process in formal settings; to educate students about the relationship between speech content, organization, purpose, style, audience, and delivery; to introduce and hone speechmaking skills through practice; and to provide students with an opportunity to research, plan, deliver, and critique speeches. Student learning targets for English 11-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will align with student-leaning objectives.]
  • Speech Communication Forensics [Semester Course. Grades 11-12. The study of communication is designed to build upon experiences from Speech Communication, but can be scheduled without having the Speech Communication class prior. This course will include, but is not limited to, the communication process, debate, speaking for special occasions (graduation, acceptance, after-dinner), oral interpretation (prose, poetry, dramatic, humorous), interviewing (college and career), group discussion (meeting, symposium, parliamentary procedure), and formal/informal theater (reader’s theater, storytelling). Students will read, discuss, and respond in writing and orally to the informational and literary texts and they will be developing and delivering numerous (10+) speeches and presentations. The goals of this course are to help students understand the communication process in formal settings; to educate students about the relationship between speech content, organization, purpose, style, audience, and delivery; to introduce and hone speechmaking skills through practice; to provide students with an opportunity to research, plan, deliver, and critique speeches; and to get students interested in and/or competing in Forensics. Student learning targets for English 11-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will align with student-leaning objectives. This course may be used for the development of a speech (forensics) or debate team.]

-Writers Seminar is now a repeatable, semester course. [Semester Course-Repeatable. This course is designed to rigorously improve student writing through the study of gifted writing models and the choices authors make. Students will participate in the following daily workshop activities: examining and discussing professional writing models as well as pre-writing, multiple drafting, revising, editing, and publishing their own works. Students will engage in close reading of essays, memoirs, novels, short stories, poems, articles on writing, etc., to develop a sense of what constitutes great writing and how it is produced. Student learning targets for English 9-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will set the baseline for student-learning objectives. This course is designed to provide writing opportunities for students who have demonstrated interest and proficiency in writing either in English 9-12 or Creative Writing. Prerequisite: Students need an application and/or recommendation from the teacher.]

-Creative Writing remains a repeatable, semester course, but can be used for preparation of poetry slam teams. [Semester Course-Repeatable. Grades 11-12. Students will engage in writing routines and protocols for creating journals, poems, narratives, fiction, short stories, plays, novels, etc., that allow for the exploration of voice, style, and language. Close reading of literary excerpts, novels, short stories, poems, instructive articles, etc. will be necessary to develop a sense of how to write creatively. Students will engage in the process of workshop, which includes pre-writing, multiple drafts, peer editing, and publishing. Students will produce numerous creative pieces. Student learning targets for English 11-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will set the baseline for student-learning objectives. Students who excel at this course may be recommended for Writers Seminar. This course may be used for production of a student literary magazine and could be useful for development of poetry slam teams.]

-Publications in Journalism, formerly Publications in Newspaper, is now a repeatable, semester course with widened parameters to include other media. [Semester Course-Repeatable. Grades 9-12. Students in this course will be responsible for the publication of the high school newspaper or other journalistic medium (newsletter, vlog, blog, social media, etc.) This course is designed to teach all elements of newspaper or other media production. Students will participate in the entire program, which will include news writing, feature and opinion writing, in-depth reporting, editorial cartooning, editing, layout, design, and publishing. In addition, students will assist with financial management, media circulation, and other necessary supportive tasks. Students will adhere to professional journalistic standards and ethics. They will report news of interest and relevance to the school community as well as provide a forum for the expression of opinion within that community. Prerequisite: Students need an application and/or recommendation from the teacher.]

-Publications in Yearbook is now a repeatable, semester course. (Semester Course-Repeatable. Grades 9-12 This course is designed to enable students to plan, design, and produce a successful yearbook. This course will include coverage of content, common layout and design applications, copy preparation procedures, theme development, and advertising and marketing techniques. Students will work as part of a team, meeting deadlines throughout the semester/year, and potentially into the summer. Consequently, a yearbook staff member must be responsible and self-motivated. Prerequisite: Students need an application and/or recommendation from the teacher.)

-Women's Literature is a new semester elective course. [Semester Course. Grades 9-12. Students will rigorously engage in reading, writing, textual citation, critical discussion, and careful analysis of literature produced by Women Writers from Ancient World through Today. Major and minor works are studied within their historical, social, philosophical, biographical, and literary contexts. Student learning targets for English 9-10 or 11-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) and Literacy in History/Social Studies 9-10 or 11-12 (reading and writing) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will set the baseline for student-learning objectives.]

-Shakespeare's Literature is a new semester elective course. [Semester Course. Grades 9-12. Students will rigorously engage in reading, writing, textual citation, critical discussion, and careful analysis of literature produced by Shakespeare (sonnets, histories, comedies, and tragedies). Shakespeare’s plays and poems are studied within their historical, literary, and universal thematic contexts. Student learning targets for English 9-10 or 11-12 (reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language) and Literacy in History/Social Studies 9-10 or 11-12 (reading and writing) as set forth by Ohio’s Learning Standards will set the baseline for student-learning objectives.]

UPCOMING SHAKESPEARE WEBINARS/SUMMER WORKSHOP FROM FOLGER

Here are some FREE Webinars being offered from Folger Teaching.
  • Race, Racism, and the Shaping of Shakespeare Mar 4, 2021 08:00 PM Join Dr. Peggy O’Brien, the Folger’s Director of Education, and Dr. Ruben Espinosa, Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at El Paso, for a conversation about race in Shakespeare. This talk considers the value of critical race studies to our teaching of Shakespeare. More specifically, it explores the way animosity toward Black and brown individuals in our present moment shapes encounters with Shakespeare. When we attend to race and racism in and through Shakespeare, we are able to apprehend the full scope of his enduring relevance today. Register here!
  • What Says She? Listening to Women’s Voices in Shakespeare Mar 11, 2021 08:00 PM Dr. Peggy O’Brien, the Folger’s Director of Education, speaks with Dr. Kathryn Vomero Santos, Assistant Professor of English at Trinity University, about gender in Shakespeare. This talk will use an intersectional feminist lens to consider the gendered construction of speech and silence in Shakespeare’s plays and their afterlives. Examine how we hear women in Shakespeare’s play when they don’t speak and how to listen to them when they speak back. Register here!
  • Shakespeare to Malcolm X: Helping ALL Students Grapple with Race and Complex Texts Thursday, March 25th at 8PM Light up your classroom, online and in real life. Learn how to set up a zone of student-centered, language-focused discovery. Let your students amaze you with their ability to make meaning from texts, all on their own. Experience firsthand a subversive, equitable way of getting students inside the language of complex texts. A way that works to engage and excite EVERY learner. A method beloved by teachers and students everywhere. An approach to teaching literary and informational texts that thousands of educators have called “transformative” and “life-changing.” Work through the same strategically scaffolded sequence of activities that you will do with your students, whether you’re online, in person, or hybrid. Engage with an intentionally created text set including such writers as Amanda Gorman, Yaa Gyasi, Julia Alvarez, Kazim Ali, Malcolm X, William Shakespeare, Jason Reynolds, Mary Shelley, and Suji Kwok Kim. Walk away with techniques you can use tomorrow and every day to help ALL students read with skill and confidence. Join the Folger community of brilliant, curious, caring, and committed teachers, and gain colleagues, ideas, and resources that will inspire you for the rest of your teaching life. Register here!
Here is another Webinar being offered from Folger Teaching as part of their membership ($40/year). Become a Teacher Member
  • Here’s to Black Women Poets, Part II. May We Know Them. May We Read Them. May We Teach Them. March 18, 2021 at 8:00PM You may know Gwendolyn Brooks, but do you know Lucille Clifton? Join poet, instructor, and the Folger’s own Poetry Coordinator Teri Cross Davis along with Maryam Trowell, Manager of Teacher and Student Programs, for the second exploration of Black women poets you know and those you should be teaching. Immerse yourself in the words of Black women poets in America, get your questions answered, and walk away with ideas for a text set that will spark the ears, eyes, and the minds of your students. This 30-minute workshop is exclusively for Teacher Members. Info here.

Here is a information about a virtual summer workshop. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS THIS MONDAY, MARCH 1ST.

  • Teaching Shakespeare 2021: Shakespeare and the Making of America June 27–July 17, 2021 A full-time, full on, three-week immersion into the holds that Shakespeare and early America have had on each other. You’ll work with 24 other curious, eager, and committed middle and high school teachers and a faculty of scholars, performance experts, and mentor teachers. With full attention to the roles that indigenous, Black, brown, and Latinx people played during this slice of history, we’ll dive deeply into two plays—The Merchant of Venice (c.1596) and The Tempest (1611)—as well as evidence and documents from Early Modern and early American history and Historic Jamestowne. Shakespeare’s “majestic vision” was clearly shaped by the colonization of America, and his work in turn shaped America through the wonders and plunders he envisioned in his plays. We’re eager to get at this. You will be in lecture and seminar, in performance sessions, and curriculum classes—in plenary sessions, breakouts, small groups, and large-scale interactive sessions too. You will be collaborating with your colleagues and with faculty as well as pursuing individual work. You will be busy. Funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, each participant will receive an NEH stipend of $2850. Find out more! How to Apply. Apply Now.

MCGRAW HILL's CELEBRATING LITERACY INSTRUCTION SERIES CONTINUES

MCGRAW HILL's CELEBRATING LITERACY INSTRUCTION SERIES CONTINUES

This is a professional development series designed for K–12 leaders and ELA educators. Here are the upcoming sessions you may want to attend.

  • MARCH 3rd Creating Culturally Responsive Curriculum with Dr. Michelle Martin 4:30 PM–5:30 PM Dr. Martin will discuss what a culturally responsive classroom is, and the next steps you can take to create an environment that embraces a diversity of thoughts, persons, and experiences. She will provide guidance on building diversity within literacy curriculum.
Register HERE for either or both sessions. Find more information HERE. Certificates of Attendance will be provided.

TURN IN YOUR AARI REPORT CARD

THE 2021 NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN READ-IN

If you hosted an African American Read In during the month of February, complete this Host Report Card submission form after your event by March 15, 2021.

CCS TEACHER-FACILITATED PD on Informational Text

How to Help Your Students Master Informational Text Presenter: Pam Reed
  • Wednesday, March 3, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
  • Location: Join Zoom Meeting https://ccsoh-us.zoom.us/j/4245216751?pwd=cDBsOWtNUGFzcmZEWWdkOEZDT3JUQT09
  • Target Audience: Middle and High School Teachers
  • In this presentation, we will work through strategies, tips and tricks to help your students master Informational Text - whether you are an ELA teacher or a Content Teacher. We all know that Informational Text can be daunting for our students, but these strategies will help students build confidence and show them the HOW with such skills as: summary, central idea, text structure, and analysis. This session will be interactive and as you will work with others to practice these strategies.

SIJO Student Competitions and Teacher Workshops offered by East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University

The East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University is excited to announce a new self-paced, asynchronous workshop, SIJO (Korean Poetry) for teachers and the Ohio Sijo Student Competition for K-12 students. If students are new to SIJO there are materials available to help them learn about and write Sijo poetry.

Feb – May 1, 2021: “Ohio Sijo (Korean Poetry) Student Competition”

Feb – May 1, 2021: “Sijo (Korean Poetry) Workshop”

  • Who: Any educator in any state (pre-service and in-service teachers, librarians, administrators, others)
  • Where: Online
  • When: Self-paced, asynchronous (2 contact hours), Deadline May 1, 2021
  • What: Teachers will learn about the history and structure of Sijo (Korean Poetry) and how to teach it to their students through online lectures, presentations, examples, and teaching materials. Information about the 2021 Ohio Sijo Competition will be included as well.
  • Website: Sijo Teacher Workshop
  • Registration (required): online link
  • Flyer: Sijo Teacher Workshop 2021

TEACHROCK NOW HAS DISTANCE LEARNING PACK VERSIONS OF LESSONS

TEACHROCK is happy to announce two new features to the TeachRock.org website that significantly improve navigating and organizing lessons. These features appear on TeachRock lesson pages in the same area where users are able to download printable versions of lessons and share lessons on various platforms. This tutorial video explains these new features that are detailed below.
  • Users now have the ability to download a Distance Learning Pack (“DLP”) version of the lesson. Distance Learning Packs are student-facing documents that aid in distance and elearning environments. Note that not all lessons have DLPs, so this option may not be available for every lesson.
  • Another new function is the ability to “Favorite” a lesson on TeachRock. In the same area where you are able to download printable lessons and DLPs, there is a “Favorite” button that instantly allows you to bookmark a lesson. Once favorited, users will be able to find the lesson in the “My Account” section.
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What are the secondary english curriculum resources?

Here is the CCS Adopted, Supplemental, and Intervention Resources List that contains all of the resources available to secondary English teachers.

  • The Tier I Instructional Resources are StudySync (English 6-12) and the Bedford Texts/Launchpad (Honors and AP English).
  • The Tier II Intervention Resource is Achieve3000
  • The Supplemental Resources (in general) are TeachingBooks and DBQ.

You can see more about StudySync, Bedford, TeachingBooks, and DBQ below in this same section of the newsletter. This information will remain here all year for your convenience.


Visit the ELA 6-12 Webpage for all Secondary English Curriculum/Resources. You will find your COURSE FOLDERS on the Curriculum/Instructional Resources Quick Links for your Grade Level. The COURSE FOLDERS have everything you need for your courses including Curriculum Maps, Standard docs, digital novels, adopted resource trainings/tutorials, Course Intros, etc.

NOTE: To access many curricular and district, you must be logged into Google using your CCS credentials and not a personal account.

Content Priorities-What Matters Most in English Under the Constraints of Remote/Pandemic Teaching and Learning

We all know that remote teaching during a global pandemic inherently leads to a slower teaching and learning pace. The director of Secondary Curriculum asked me to put together some slides for how to adapt to the slower pace by showing what the three main priorities would be for teaching English in our new normal. The priorities are not much different than what they would be in a face-to-face situation, but they are narrowed and more focused.


Priority I: Essential Practice

  • significant instructional time with ELA disciplines: reading, writing, discussion

  • strategies/scaffolds for comprehension and composition that transfer across texts/contexts

Priority 2: Standard Alignment

  • questioning/activities/lessons/assessments that apply standard knowledge and skills to ELA disciplines: reading, writing, discussion

  • heavier focus on targeted standards from OST
  • awareness of PreAP/AP standards (Honors & AP)

Priority 3: Adopted Resource

  • use of StudySync (English 6-12) for integrated, on-grade-level, scaffolded lessons that inherently include Priorities 1 and 2

  • use of Bedford texts/Launchpad (Honors & AP) for foundational, skill, and theme/topic lessons that that inherently include Priorities 1 and 2


-In general, the first priority focuses on the essential practices for your classroom time. The second priority lists the standards that you should focus on the most for questions, activities, lessons, and assessments using the grade-level, complex texts from your essential practice in priority one. It may be that those priority standards become your narrowed focus for the rest of the year. The third priority shows you how the adopted resources inherently meet priorities one and two. It should be noted that in StudySync, you teach all of the standards listed in priority two in the first four CORE ELA units for your grade level. It may be that you try to do just those four units instead of six this school year due to our slower pace caused by remote learning.

-Below are the slides with the priorities detailed including which standards are the most important for preparing a student to be college and career ready and to do well on the OST. You will find resource links from the CCS ELA 6-12 Webpage and our adopted resources for meeting the priorities. You will find research behind each of the priorities and why they are the most important for a narrowed focus. You will want to read through each carefully as they each contain several items of information.


CONTENT PRIORITY SLIDES FOR SECONDARY ENGLISH

Content Priorities ELA 6-8

Content Priorities English 9-12

Content Priorities Honors 9-10/AP 11-12


-You can also find the Content Priority Slides on the ELA 6-12 Webpage in the "CCS ELA GUIDING DOCUMENTS" section of the Curriculum/Instructional Resources 6-8 and the Curriculum/Instructional Resources 9-12 Quick Link pages.

STUDYSYNC ACCESS

-You AND your students access StudySync via the Clever icon or http://clever.com/in/columbuscity. Click on the McGraw Hill icon. Then, launch the StudySync App.

-Your classes are marked with X and Y. The X classes were for first semester and the Y classes are for second semester. If you want to change the names of your classes in StudySync, follow this guide:

StudySync-How to Change Course Names

-Here is information about linking StudySync to Google Classroom.

-Here is the demo code for StudySync in case you have a student teacher, building coach, or admin that wants to see the platform and they do not have a class aligned in Clever/IC.

  • DEMO: my.mheducation.com
  • UN: studysync2021
  • PW: MHEela21

STUDYSYNC SUPPORT

Help Center

Finding the Help Center in StudySync (video)

-Remember, if you have a question that deals with CCS infrastructure as it relates to StudySync (Clever, rostering, IC, etc.), those questions would be for Tim Wangler.


Tutorials, Trainings, and Webinars


Ask-an-Expert Sessions


Remote Teaching Documents


Resources/Bit.ly Links from StudySync Training Presenters

Teacher Resources from StudySync: https://bit.ly/3iZJigI

Administration Resources from StudySync: https://bit.ly/3jsuLua


Here are the finalized/updated support emails/numbers for McGraw Hill.

Teacher Support McGraw Hill

Administrator Support McGraw Hill

Student/Parent Support McGraw Hill

studysync usage

StudySync should be used in the same manner as any adopted "textbook." It is the place where the CORE ELA Units for Grades 6-12 are housed (print-student consumable; digital-StudySync online). It is where students access grade-level, complex texts that they will read, write about, and have discussions around. It is the resource that offers scaffolding at point of use for students to access complex texts. It is the place where standards are mastered using reading, writing, and skill lessons. It is the place where you have a up-to-date information on how your students are mastering standards because the StudySync grade book has a Standards view that allows you to see every assignment a student has done aligned to a standard and offers ideas for remediation (StudySync Gradebook & Data Analysis). It is NOT a literacy intervention tool like Achieve3000 that has programmatic goals for students. It is important to make this distinction because teachers need to take ownership of using StudySync as their Tier 1 Instructional resource. The bulk of your curriculum should come from StudySync. Teachers are still free to add and take away from the units, just as you might have a textbook in the past. However, it is not ok to just use StudySync for testing and blasts. If you have been doing that, please make the change to using StudySync's CORE ELA Units. The first read, skill, close read routine found there is exactly what our students need to master standards using complex text. It is also important to note that StudySync is not a supplemental product, like TeachingBooks or DBQ Online. Those are available for your use but should not be the place you go to for the bulk of your curriculum.

BEDFORD/LAUNCHPAD access and support

Access

To get to Launchpad through Clever http://clever.com/in/columbuscity, click the Launchpad icon and click on the name of class/textbook. Student texts were sent to the buildings. All students have a hardback text, Honors students should also have a workbook. If you experienced problems with Launchpad since the change to second semester, those should be fixed now. Reach out to Tim Wangler if you encounter any other issues.

Support

HELP CENTER FORM: https://macmillan.force.com/bfwhighschool/s/

Trainings and Tutorials
Bedford Overviews, Slideshows, Trainings, and Tutorials

AP Professional Development Online Workshops

Learn More about these online workshops. Register Here.

Updated AP Course Pacing Guides (Due to Pandemic)

TeachingBooks Access and Support

ACCESS

You AND your students access TeachingBooks via the Clever icon or http://clever.com/in/columbuscity. Click on the TeachingBooks icon.

UPCOMING PD (20-Minute Webinars)

TUTORIALS/TRAININGS

-TeachingBooks is the tool that houses the lists of books we have in the warehouse and in the Secondary English Curriculum Office. Use this TeachingBooks Tutorial to learn how to access the CCS book lists.

- TeachingBooks also is a place to get additional novel and author resources. These Overview videos/trainings from TeachingBooks can help you understand the resources: Introduction video I Slide Presentation and Training Script.

-October 16th PD Session for CCS: Virtual and Blending Learning Recording

-February 3rd PD Session for CCS: Booklists, Virtual Ideas, and More on TeachingBooks

DBQ Literature Mini-Qs: Supplemental Resource access and support

DBQ has given us FREE access to the Literature Mini-Qs this school year. You access them via via the Clever icon or http://clever.com/in/columbuscity. Click on the The DBQ Project icon. Each school also has a hard-copy binder of the lessons. Making copies of these for subs would be a great way to have standard-aligned, high-quality lessons since subs will not/may not have access to StudySync.

--Access Live and Self-Paced PD for DBQ Here.

  • Open Self-Paced Courses: asynchronous course with a run time around 5 hours that aims to familiarize teachers with The DBQ Project Method.
  • Open Virtual Workshops: live workshops with a DBQ Project Professional Development Lead. 2 hours long, these workshops are built to help teachers with DBQ Project material and DBQ Online with a specific focus on remote and hybrid-learning needs.

--Here is a Smore for DBQ Online Educator Support.

--Here is a Smore for DBQ Online Student Support

--Check out the newest addition to the DBQ Platform, Unit Trailers, with this sample for

How Does The Great Gatsby Reflect America in the Twenties?

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MONTHLY CCS ENGLISH COURSE MEETINGS

The next course meeting day is TUESDAY, March 9th. If you have ever wanted to talk to other English teachers in the district about teaching ideas for the course(s) you instruct, now is your chance to join a Zoom session to

  • share how they are making the most of our adopted resources (e. g. StudySync) to maximize student learning,
  • show teaching ideas that have worked well this year,
  • ask other colleagues how they are handling something you want to try, etc.

There is no set agenda for this meetings, so bring your ideas to share. The district will plan to have some Course Meetings every second, Tuesday. The remaining dates are 3/9, 4/13, 5/11. We may not be able to have every course, every month due to the available number of hosting Zoom rooms, but we will offer as many as we can. You will be able to find the ones available for each date in this newsletter the week of the meetings.


MAKING MEANING OF MAY 4: THE KENT STATE SHOOTINGS IN US HISTORY SUMMER WORKSHOP-APPLICATION DUE MARCH 1ST

Kent State University is pleased to announce they will offer the National Endowment for the Humanities-supported Landmarks Workshop "Making Meaning of May 4: The Kent State Shootings in US History" twice during the Summer of 2021: June 20–25, 2021, and July 18–23, 2021 through remote delivery. Graduate credit and contact hour options will be available. They are accepting applications from educators of students in the middle school through high school levels. They also welcome those who applied by the March 1 deadline for 2020 to remain in the applicant pool for 2021. 2020 applicants do not need to submit a new application for 2021.

“Making Meaning of May 4” explores the history of the shooting of student demonstrators at Kent State on May 4, 1970. What Kent State calls “May Fourth” is recognized for changing public opinion about the Vietnam War; setting precedent in the US Supreme Court; changing National Guard armament policy; helping to lower the voting age to 18; impacting culture and the arts; and reminding us all to practice and protect the First Amendment. You’ll work with the best scholar-experts to develop a lesson plan for your students—all disciplines are welcome. Workshop faculty include witnesses to the shootings, surviving casualties of the shootings, K–12 experts, and experts on movements of the 1960s. You’ll also learn how to access extensive archival information to use with students.

  • Remote delivery (100% online)
  • For middle and high school educators
  • Offered twice: June 20–25, 2021 & July 18–23, 2021
  • $1,300 stipend paid to participants
  • Grad credit & contact hour options available
  • Applicants who met the March 1, 2020, deadline will be kept in the applicant pool
  • New applicants should submit applications by March 1, 2021

Learn more here: https://www.may4neh.org/. Apply here: https://www.may4neh.org/how-to-apply.html. All applicants will be notified of their selection status on Friday, March 26, 2021.


EQUITY IN ACTION: FOSTERING AN ANTIRACIST LIBRARY CULTURE

Hear how library leaders are taking actions and using tools to make their libraries more inclusive in our online Equity in Action: Fostering an Antiracist Library Culture course starting February 23. In this three-week, interactive workshop with an exciting guest speaker lineup, you’ll learn how to create an internal culture founded on principles of equity, diversity, and inclusion. You’ll complete assignments to build your own equity-based initiative in an interactive online classroom environment with personal coaching from an expert in the field.

The speaker program runs on Tuesdays, February 23, March 2, and March 9, 2:00-4:00 pm ET (recordings available) with an ongoing workshop over three weeks.

View Full Program; Register Today!


OHIO PUBLIC RADIO/TV SPEAKING OPPORTUNITY FOR YOUR CLASSROOMS

Andy Chow with Ohio Public Radio/TV would like to start a speaking/outreach program where he and his colleague talk to high school students about the career possibilities in journalism and broadcasting. They would visit your classes (virtually) to talk about the careers and answer any questions. If you are interested in this, please reach out to Andy at achow@statehousenews.org.


OCTELA 2021-RECORDED SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE FOR ATTENDEES/MEMBERS

The Ohio Council of Teachers of English Language Arts sessions from OCTELA 21 are available at their site for members of OCTELA who registered for the conference. Visit the CONFERENCE PORTAL to access the recordings.


OHIO LITERACY ACADEMY 2021-RECORDED SESSIONS NOW AVAILABLE

The Ohio Department of Education is offering all content from the Ohio Literacy Academy 2021 to all Ohio educators. Visit the Ohio Literacy Academy 2021 page to learn more about the content offerings, access videos, see the viewing guides, and take note of further content to be added in March and May. This Vimeo site: Ohio Literacy Academy 2021 on-demand videos has over 35 sessions that you can view. Districts, schools, and early childhood education programs are encouraged to use these resources as part of a comprehensive professional learning plan. Here are the sessions that were included in the 6-12 and multi-age bands:


INTERNATIONAL LITERACY ASSOCIATION DIGITAL EVENT

Culturally Relevant and Responsive: Literacy Instruction in 2021 and Beyond-Tuesday, March 9 | 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

This is a three-hour event, with a keynote from groundbreaking scholar Gloria Ladson-Billings, designed to guide literacy educators and leaders through the work of creating an inclusive school environment—one that respects and reflects all learners.

Topics include:

  • How educators can identify the effects their own backgrounds and implicit biases have on teaching and learning
  • How to question pedagogy and policies that negatively impact learner outcomes
  • Proactive steps literacy and school leaders can take to dismantle oppressive systems

Registration: $99


OHIO HUMANITIES: CELEBRATING BLACK HISTORY-VIRTUAL EVENT


NCTE SEEKS JOURNAL EDITOR for English Leadership Quarterly

NCTE’s Conference on English Leadership (CEL) is seeking the next editor of English Leadership Quarterly. Finalists will be interviewed via videoconference in spring 2021. The applicant appointed by the CEL Executive Committee will effect a transition, preparing for their first issue in August 2022. The appointment is for four years, renewable for three years. Learn more about the application process here.


NBCT PD OFFERINGS FROM CCS TEACHERS

-Check out the current offerings HERE.


CORWIN'S MONDAY FREE WEBINAR SERIES

View the FREE Webinars here.

-Up next is Developing & Using Success Criteria to Maximize Teaching and Learning Monday, March 8, 2021 - 3:30pm Presented by John Almarode, Douglas Fisher, Kateri Thunder, and Nancy Frey


GRAMERCY BOOKS AUTHOR EVENTS

Here is the line-up for the upcoming author events at Gramercy Books on Main Street in Bexley.


READING LIKE A HISTORIAN PD INSTITUTES

Institute 1: Introduction to Reading Like a Historian Curriculum and Beyond the Bubble Assessments February 24, March 10, and March 24, 2021; 6-8pm ET

Institute 2: Designing and Adapting Reading Like a Historian Curriculum March 3, March 17, and March 31, 2021; 6-8pm ET

LEARN MORE and REGISTER HERE.


SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL FREE VIRTUAL EVENT: MIDDLE GRADE MAGIC ON MARCH 9TH

Join SLJ for Middle Grade Magic 2021 to get a behind-the-scenes glimpse at some of the most anticipated new titles for kids and tweens, from modern coming-of-age tales to eye-popping graphic novels to submersive fantasy. You'll also hear from librarians, who will share how they’ve incorporated programs and activities focused exclusively on this age group. Attendees will also have the opportunity to check out the virtual exhibit hall, chat directly with authors, download educational resources, and enter to win prizes and giveaways.

Register Here for Middle Grade Magic. Event Hours: 9:00AM ET - 5:00PM ET


THE COLUMBUS METROPOLITAN LIBRARY'S CARNEGIE AUTHOR SERIES: AUTHOR TALKS

Here is the rest of the supurb line-up for this season.

Registration will open soon for the rest of these author talks at the Carnegie Author Series site.

  • Lisa Wingate (Before We Were Yours), August 29, 2pm
  • Wil Haygood (Tigerland), October 7, 7pm; Remember this is the book about East High School. You could plan to read it at the beginning of next school year and have your students attend his author talk.
  • Brit Bennett (The Vanishing Half) December 5, 2pm


OHIO TEACHER OF THE YEAR: NOMINATIONS OPEN & TEACHING IN TAIWAN PROGRAM

The Ohio Teacher of the Year program annually identifies exceptional teachers and celebrates their effective, inspiring work both inside and outside of the classroom. The Department currently is accepting nominations for this prestigious honor. Submit nominations by April 9.


Through a memorandum of understanding with Taiwan’s Ministry of Education, the Ohio Department of Education and the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) in Chicago invite Ohio English language arts, English as a second language and world language teachers to apply to the Teaching English in Taiwan Program. The program seeks new, experienced, and recently retired teachers who hold current Ohio licensure. Educators selected to work in Taiwan will teach English to elementary or middle school students for one academic year. Teaching contracts are from 10 to 11 months, depending on the placement.

Teaching English in Taiwan Program applications due by April 23


THE EAST ASIAN STUDIES CENTER AT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY is pleased to offer free opportunities for K-12 teachers in Summer 2021. These seminars fill quickly, so register early.

JULY 12-23, 2021: NCTA “The Journey of East Asia: Adventures Through Stories, Games, and Maps”

JUNE 7-18, 2021: Global Teacher Seminar: “Global Social Justice, Activism, and Protests”


AMLE INSTITUTE FOR MIDDLE LEVEL LEADERSHIP

AMLE will host an Institute for Middle Level Leadership July 11-14 at Renaissance Orlando at Sea World in Florida. In addition to providing unparalleled training for middle school leaders and teams, the Institute will also be an opportunity for educators to reflect and grow from this past year’s challenges and look to the future. Registration is open! Space will be limited due to social distancing, to save your spot get your name on the list today. Reserve your Spot.

In addition to providing world-class faculty who will provide personalized coaching on the most pressing topics in middle school education, this Institute will be a unique opportunity for attendees to receive in-depth training on AMLE’s newly updated foundational text, The Successful Middle School: This We Believe.


BULK BOOKSTORE GIVEAWAY

HERE is the contest to win $500 in Books.

HERE is the grant opportunity to win $1,000 in Books

HERE is the contest to win 5 copies of Their Eyes Were Watching God (exp. March 1st)

Save $25 at Bulk BookStore with code: BOOKLOVE ($400 minimum order, expires March 1st)


AMLE STORE CUPON

Use MLEM21 at checkout for 20% off AMLE store where shipping is always free for AMLE members. During the entire month of March all orders will receive a bonus FREE copy of The Successful Middle School: This We Believe.


TEACHINGBOOKS BLOG-CONTESTS AND GIVEAWAYS

HERE are the highlighted contests and giveaways for February 2021.


WE ARE TEACHERS-CONTESTS AND GIVEAWAYS

HERE are the highlighted contests and giveaways.

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THURBER HOUSE'S YOUNG WRITERS' STUDIO FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

Students in 9th–12th grade who love writing stories, crafting new worlds, and building never-before-seen characters, should sign up for Thurber House's Young Writers' Studio! Young Writers' Studio will be held online on Zoom until it's safe to meet in person. They meet every other week with author and English professor Robert Loss. They kick off the first hour with quality writing prompts and activities. They wrap up the last hour with the chance to workshop pieces that you or others share. It's a safe, low-key, fun way to enjoy writing and meet others!

Click Here to Learn More; Click Here to Register

Winter/Spring 2021 Schedule (6:30-8:30pm on Select Tuesdays)

  • Tuesday, March 2
  • Tuesday, March 16
  • Tuesday, March 30
  • Tuesday, April 13
  • Tuesday, April 27

A limited number of scholarships are available for this program. Email megbrown@thurberhouse.org for more information.


THURBER HOUSE WRITING WIZARDS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL

The Winter Writing Wizards Classes for Grades 6, 7, and 8, will meet via Zoom on Saturdays: February 27 and March 6, 13, 20 Learn More; Register for Writing Wizards

You can sign up for one or both sets of classes.

  • Poems for Life 10:00 – 11:30 am ET The world is full of weird events...murder hornets?! You’ll learn to look at real-world events like a poet, and have fun reinventing them through your writing and making your voice heard.
  • Ensembles Assemble! 12:00 – 1:30 pm ET What if we make a whole ensemble of vampires, robots, and more, each created by a person in the class, all in the same shared story? Writing a character is fun—but writing a universe together is magical.


BROADWAY MUSICAL THEATER CLUB: HAMILTON CLASS

For $15 students aged 9-14 can join a 50-minute class where they will discuss and sing along with Hamilton. They'll discuss how Hamilton came to Broadway, play some trivia, and learn and talk about topics they initiate. Classes are available through March 27th, but they are filling up fast. Check out all of the classes and register HERE.


NCTE STUDENT WRITING AWARDS

Here are two writing contest from NCTE.

Achievement Awards in Writing (for 11th grade students)

This school-based writing program encourages high school students in their writing and publicly recognizes some of the best student writers in the nation. NEW Deadline March 26

Promising Young Writers (for 8th grade students)

This school-based writing program stimulates and recognizes student’s writing talents and emphasizes the importance of writing skills among eighth-grade students. NEW Deadline March 26


HUMANITIES STUDENT/CLASS SUBMISSIONS

Humanities Moments

Through the National Humanities Center’s Humanities Moments project, users submit short videos and essays recalling how an encounter with the humanities, whether through a book, film, document, performance, or something else, profoundly affected their lives.

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Song of the Week

Remi Wolf - Hello Hello Hello (Clean)

did you miss earlier issues of the secondary english weekly newsletter?

Each week, this Secondary English Weekly Newsletter will be linked in an email sent to ELA and ELA-related teachers in Grades 6-12 and posted on the CCS English Language Arts 6-12 Page (https://www.ccsoh.us/English6-12). It will contain all of the latest information that could prove useful to you and your students. If you know of anyone who needs to be added to the mailing list, please send their name(s) to cphillips3865@columbus.k12.oh. Happy Educating!