Julius Caesar Journal

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In William Shakespeare’s tragedy, “Julius Caesar”, the dangers of manipulation are emphasized by the use of symbolism, and rhetoric devices.
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Upon being convinced, Brutus later describes Caesar “as a serpent’s egg- Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—“ (Act II, sc i, 33-34), and before he could actually become corrupt solve the problem is to kill him as a person as to kill the snake “in his shell” (Act II, Sc i, 36). This was essentially an attempt to convince himself, which is essentially manipulating oneself, to be able to go through with such a heinous deed despite respecting Caesar so.
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Brutus had given his speech rallying all those in Rome, and Antony, now at a disadvantage, must use his time in order to turn the tides. “Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, And sure he is an honorable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know.” (Act III, Sc 2, 107-110) He doesn’t force his ideals on people, but instead advises people to rethink about what Brutus had said. It doesn’t suggest that he’s a liar, still stating that he’s an “honorable” man, a cunning way to turn people’s opinions over to your side.