Renewable VS Non-Renewable

Bianca Mchenry

Renewable Resources

  1. A renewable resource is a resource which is replaced naturally and can be used again. Examples are: oxygen, fresh water, solar energy, timber, and biomass. Renewable resources may also include goods commodities such as wood, paper and leather.

Biomass

  1. Biomass is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms. In the context of biomass for energy this is often used to mean plant based material, but biomass can equally apply to both animal and vegetable derived material.

Wind Energy

  1. A wind turbine is the popular name for a device that converts kinetic energy from the wind into electrical power. Technically there is no turbineused in the design but the term appears to have migrated from parallel hydroelectric technology.

Geothermal

  1. Geothermal energy is thermal energy generated and stored in the Earth. Thermal energy is the energy that determines the temperature of matter. The geothermal energy of the Earth's crust originates from the original formation of the planet and from radioactive decay of materials.

Solar Energy

  1. Solar energy is radiant light and heat from the sun harnessed using a range of ever-evolving technologies such as solar heating, solar photovoltaics, solar thermal energy, solar architecture and artificial photosynthesis.

Hydropower

  1. Hydropower or water power is power derived from the energy of falling water and running water, which may be harnessed for useful purposes.

Non-Renewable Resources

  1. The original organic material, with the aid of heat and pressure, becomes a fuel such as oil or gas. Earth minerals and metal ores, fossil fuels (such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas), nuclear fuels, and groundwater in certain aquifers are all non-renewable resources.

Fossil Fuels

  1. Fossil fuel is a general term for buried combustible geologic deposits of organic materials, formed from decayed plants and animals that have been converted to crude oil, coal, natural gas, or heavy oils by exposure to heat and pressure in the earth's crust over hundreds of millions of years.

Coal

  1. Coal is a fossil fuel formed from the decomposition of organic materials that have been subjected to geologic heat and pressure over millions of years. Coal is considered a nonrenewable resource because it cannot be replenished on a human time frame.

Nuclear Energy


  1. the energy released during nuclear fission or fusion, especially when used to generate electricity.