Betty Friedan

By: Jenny Lor

Betty Friedan

  • The Feminine Mystique, which explores the idea of women finding fulfillment beyond traditional roles.
  • Friedan co-founded the National Organization for Women in 1966.
  • She published The Second Stage in 1982and The Fountain of Age in 1993.
  • She also fought for abortion rights by establishing the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws (now known as NARAL Pro-Choice America) in 1969.
  • Create the National Women's Political Caucus in 1971.

Events/Areas/Schools Involve In

"The mother of the modern women's liberation movement."

Betty Friedan famous book, "The Feminine Mystique", changed America. She re-awakened the feminist movement in the US. That movement had helped women gain the right to vote in the 1920s. She was born in Betty Goldstein in 1921 in Peoria, Illinois. Her father worked as a jeweler and her mother left her job with a local newspaper to stay home with her family. She attended Smith College in North Hampton, Massachusetts. She finished her studies in psychology in 1942. While writing her book "The Feminine Mystique, she met with experts and asked questions to find answer to put it all together.


The book helped change the lives of women in America. More women began working outside the home. More women also began studying traditionally male subjects like law, medicine and engineering.In nineteen sixty-six, Betty Friedan helped establish NOW, the National Organization for Women. She served as its first president. She led campaigns to end unfair treatment of women seeking jobs. Friedan also worked on other issues. She wanted women to have the choice to end their pregnancies. She wanted to create child-care centers for working parents. She wanted women to take part in social and political change.

Connections

  • In nineteen sixty-six, Betty Friedan helped establish NOW, the National Organization for Women. She served as its first president. She led campaigns to end unfair treatment of women seeking jobs.
  • Gloria Marie Steinem (born March 25, 1934) is an American feminist, journalist, and social and political activist who became nationally recognized as a leader and spokeswoman for the feminist movement in the late 1960s and early 70s