Sir Robert Borden

By: Lily, Dylan, and Chelsea

Introduction

L)

My partners (yes, we are including Dylan) and I were interested in Sir Robert Borden. We created questions and researched a lot about him. We found lots of information and hope to teach you more about him.

C)

"It can hardly be expected that we shall put 400,000 or 500,000 men in the feild and willingly accept the position of having more voice and receiving no more consideration than if we were toy automata." ~Sir Robert Borden

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Childhood

C)

Sir Robert Borden was born on June 26th, 1854, in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia. His death date was June 10th, 1937 in Ottawa, Ontario of a Heart Failure.


L)

He spent his childhood growing up on a farm, and went to Arcadia Villa Academy. He did not go to University and by age 14, he mastered Latin, German and French.


C)

His family had previously lived in England and moved to Nova Scotia sometime before he was born. At age 19, he was offered a teaching job in Matawan, New Jersey.

Family

L)

Sir Robert Borden’s father was named Andrew Borden. He owned a farm in Grand Pre and married Catherine Sofia Fuller. They had a son named Tomas Andrew and a daughter Sophia Amelia, before Catherine died. Later he married Eunice Jane Laird and had Robert Borden. Afterwards they had a son named John William who later got a job as a Senior Servant Department of Militia and Defence of Ottawa. Also they had a daughter Julia Rebecca who was unmarried and lived with her parents. Andrew had another son Henry Clifford nicknamed Hal. Hal practised as a lawyer and was one of Robert's favourite siblings. Robert Borden married Laura Bond.

Job

C)

He was Prime Minister from Oct.10th, 1911 to Oct.12th, 1917, and again from Oct. 12th 1917 to July 10th, 1920. He gave women that had a relative fighting in the war the right to vote and then he retired in 1920.

Extra Info

L)

He committed 500,000 Troops to the effort to beat Germany, but the result of that were strikes, shortages, and that at the end of the war, it would take 61,000 Canadian lives, and wound another 172, 000 Canadian people. Lots of people that joined the army were unemployed or homeless.

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LC)

Thank-you for watching our presentation!



Enjoy this picture of Kawii marshmallows :)