EAGLE TRACTS

CORNERSTONE INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY

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TO THE EAGLE FAMILY

Dear C.I.A. Community,


I welcome you to the month of March with immense pleasure.


“Develop a passion for learning. If you do, you will never cease to grow”. Anthony J. D’Angelo


I chose to share the quote above with you because of how it inspires me as an educator.


Life long learners have a sustained love for learning which keeps them growing in knowledge. At the academy, we believe student learning goes beyond the walls of the school, inspiring them to take action within and outside the school premises.


We are aware that parents are providing a great deal of support to our students as the semester unfolds. These efforts together with what they learn in school will shape them into the life-long learners we hope for.

As students progress through their schooling, the support they require from us may change at different stages. Research has proven that a strong partnership between parents and school impacts immensely on the academic and social development of children. We are thus, thankful for your continued support in raising our students to be active global citizens.


In relation to our monthly celebration of the IB Learner Profile, I invite you to reflect on the attribute ‘Courageous’. I believe a courageous person faces reality, confront their fear and have hope. Courageous people approach uncertainties and unfamiliar situations with forethought. They also possess the motivation and drive to try new things. Having this in mind, our students, facilitators and staff members will look for opportunities within the school and beyond to demonstrate what it means to be courageous. We will celebrate the courage students exhibit while they learn, play and interact with their peers and the environment around them.


I urge parents to join us explore the different ways we can exhibit courage by sharing your thoughts and actions about this Learner Profile attribute on our social media handles.


Please take note of all the upcoming events outlined in this newsletter as we will be excited to have your participation in different ways required.


I look forward to an amazing month ahead and with a positive team spirit.


Eagle family, together we soar!




Sincerely,


Ms. Esther Osei-Nkansah

Vice Principal

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"GHANA, OUR BELOVED COUNTRY, IS FREE FOREVER!!!"

On 6th March, 1957, the Gold Coast (now known as Ghana) gained independence from Britain. Ghana became a member of the Commonwealth of Nations and was led to independence by Dr. Kwame Nkrumah and the other great leaders notably referred to as 'The Big Six'. Ghana was the first African country to gain independence from European colonialism. Before Ghana was colonized, the country was made up of a number of independent kingdoms, including Gonja and Dagomba in the north, Ashanti in the interior, and the Fante states along the coast.


Dr. Nkrumah saw independent Ghana as a spearhead for the liberation of the rest of Africa from colonial rule and the establishment of a socialist African unity under his leadership.


The flag of the newly independent state was designed by Mrs. Theodosia Salome Okoh, which had three colors (red, gold and green) with a black star. The red signifies those who had died for independence, the gold represents the mineral wealth of the country and the green represents the rich grasslands of the area. The black star is the symbol of the people and of African emancipation.


THE NATIONAL PLEDGE

I promise on my honour to be faithful and loyal to Ghana my Motherland.

I pledge myself to the service of Ghana, with all my strength and with all my heart.

I promise to hold in high esteem our heritage, won for us through the blood and toil of our fathers; and I pledge myself in all things to uphold and defend the good name of Ghana.

So help me God.


References

Biography.com, ‘Kwame Nkrumah’, [online], Available at www.biography.com[Accessed: 13 February 2012]|Alistair B. ‘This Day in African History: 06 March’, from African History, [online], Available at www.africanhistory.about.com[Accessed: 13 February 2012]|Answers.com, ‘Ghana’, [online], Available at www.answers.com[Accessed: 13 February 2012]

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1. Face reality

Courageous people accept that they are not in control of things because they understand that life is a series of fortunate and unfortunate events where they don't always get what they want or need. They acknowledge problems and don't run away from them. They reflect on the things that have hindered their success and are never in denial because they know denial produces more suffering and disappointment.


2. Confront fear

Courageous people trust themselves and tackle their problems directly by evaluating situations and taking action accordingly. They know that confronting their fears is the best strategy to get over them, and they do so in a timely manner. Experiencing fear is not something unusual to them nor something to be ashamed of. Even in the most difficult circumstances, when they feel afraid, they are brave and wisely employ their resources to obtain victory.


3. Have hope

Courageous people are hopeful. They are sustained by faith and are confident that things will work out for them in one way or another. They can anticipate favorable and encouraging results by waiting expectantly. They refrain from worrying because it doesn't produce anything positive. Hope is their source of strength to keep them going no matter what. The anticipation of living and leading a better, brighter, and more meaningful life is one of their strongest desires.


4. Persevere through struggles

Courageous people don't give up. They may fall, but they get up to fight again as many times as they need to. They keep moving. They are very well aware that struggles are only temporary and that's what keeps them waiting persistently. They visualize themselves conquering their struggles while passing through life's storms. They avoid getting wrapped up in their own worlds and refuse to get into a pattern of negative thinking.


5. Less Complaints

Courageous people may express their feelings about their challenges, but they do so without complaining. They are very well aware that complaining will not help them overcome their struggles. They keep their emotions in check and don't allow worrying or negativity to filter through and create unnecessary stress that will rob them of their inner peace. They intelligently use their energy to focus on solutions.


6. Challenge themselves

Courageous people like to grow as individuals by stepping out of their comfort zone to learn new things and try new experiences that will take them to new heights and expand their horizons. As they grow and improve, they also enhance the lives of the people around them. Challenging themselves also provides them with a better understanding of what that they really want and need to achieve personally and professionally.


7. Keep an open mind

Courageous people don't limit themselves by having tunnel vision. They instead opt to have a 360-degree view of their environment to broaden their vision and see the full range of possibilities and opportunities to find innovative solutions. They keep their minds open by welcoming new things and new ways of doing things. They are creative thinkers with a spark of joy. They recognize that the greatest satisfactions in life come from conquering their struggles.


source:Inc.Africa

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CELEBRATION OF LEARNER PROFILE ATTRIBUTE COURAGEOUS
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Valentine's Day Celebration

Valentine is widely believed to be the practice of sending love to others in the form of gifts and messages. Facilitators at C.I.A. made beautiful cards with lovely messages to express their love and affection towards students and staff during a special morning assembly organized on Valentine's Day.
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In celebration of the unit of inquiry titled 'community helpers', first grade students dressed as various community helpers to celebrate the various professions and the services they provide in the community.
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THIRD GRADE STUDENT POSTERS ON ORGANISATIONAL LOGO CREATIONS

Please Click to Watch (3rd Grade)

During a morning assembly, third grade students climaxed their learning in the unit of inquiry titled, 'humanitarianism' by making posters of organizational logos and how these organizations can help the need.

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In C.I.A., Tulip is the name given to one of our kindergarten homerooms. Here is a beautiful write up from a student in the Tulip homeroom. Let us learn more about the colorful flower Tulip.
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A limerick is a five-line poem that consists of a single stanza, an AABBA rhyme scheme, and whose subject is a short, pithy tale or description. Most limericks are comedic, some are downright crude, and nearly all are trivial in nature.
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NEWSFEED FROM THE MIDDLE SCHOOL

VALENTINE'S DAY CELEBRATION AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL


On the 14th of February 2022, students were encouraged to exhibit love and kindness towards each other through an event dubbed “Appreciation Day”. During this event, students presented gifts and appreciation notes to their friends and colleagues.

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ARE YOU READY???

As part of activities organized to help unearth potential and skills in students, the MYP is organizing an ongoing Puppetry contest to tap into the creative and expressive abilities of students. Students will create puppets, write scripts and perform in front of their colleagues, to equip them with public speaking, confidence and presentation skills.
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INTERNATIONAL MOTHER LANGUAGE CELEBRATION AT THE MIDDLE SCHOOL

During the recently held International Mother Language Day, students educated their colleagues and faculty on the importance of speaking our mother tongue, through dance, poetry, drama and outstanding performances during the beauty contest dubbed “MYP’s Most Beautiful".

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Can you assist the ant locate its hill? Let us give it a try!!!
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SCREENTIME AND WRITING

Certain educational concepts have become more engaging thanks to technology. Technology connects children with their friends and distant family members while also providing fun entertainment for them. At times, it provides a welcome respite for parents. It is, however, critical to set limits to ensure that screen time does not negatively impact a child's health, development, or mental well-being.

Excessive screen time can harm developing brains in a variety of ways. According to research, our brains do not fully develop until around the age of 25. The National Institutes of Health started a study in 2018 and found that children who spent more than two hours a day on screen time performed worse on language and thinking tests. According to the study, children who spent more than seven hours a day on screens showed a thinning of the cortex, which manages critical thinking and reasoning.

A Canadian longitudinal study found a negative relationship between screen time and motor proficiency in children aged 4, 5, and 7. Sally Payne, a pediatric therapist at the Heart of England Foundation NHS Trust, stated that children today do not have the hand strength and dexterity that they did ten years ago. She mentions how much time children spend in front of a TV, tablet, or smartphone is affecting their ability to develop the underlying foundation skills required to grip and hold a pencil.

Most experts recommend two hours of screen time per day, but distance learning has made that impossible for parents to enforce for the time being. Still, as we return to normalcy, restoring realistic screen time limits outside of school is beneficial to our children's health and well-being.


Here's how you can begin to restore screen time limits


When children beg, whine, and bargain for more time to talk with friends, watch a favorite show, or finish a game round, you can tell that your child is spending too much time in front of a screen.


According to research, you should not allow your child to have any media devices in their bedroom. Children who have a television or mobile device in their bedrooms are much more likely to be online than children who do not. These children also get less sleep than others, regardless of how frequently they log on, possibly due to the effect of blue light emissions from technological devices on sleep-wake cycles.


To encourage other activities and protect kids' sleep, consider having children plug in their phones, tablets, or any other devices in a room other than their bedroom at night.


According to research, viewing content with a child and actively discussing themes, critically thinking about what is viewed, and discussing the effects and meaning of the viewed content is one of the best types of monitoring parents can do. Make it a habit to be aware of what your child sees and hears when they are online, playing video games, or watching TV.


Let us keep an eye out the next time we notice our children struggling with writing at school. Their screen time activities are probably a little excessive.


Reference

Lee, J., Kubik, M.Y, Fulkerson, J.A. (2018). Media devices in parents' and children's bedrooms and children's media use. American Journal of Health Behavior; 42(1):135-143.

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry is an organization dedicated to the advancement of child and adolescent psychiatry. Children and Screen Time


Akpene Ocloo

School Counselor

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MUSIC IN ME, MUSIC IN US

The brain is made up of muscles that when stressed, will need to be relaxed. Good melody and nice words have the power to relax the brain muscles and ease mental stress. Music has also been linked to dopamine release, involved in regulating mood and craving behavior, which seem to predict music's ability to bring us pleasure. Coupled with the effects of endorphins, music seems to make us feel good and connect with others, perhaps particularly when we make music ourselves. Learning involves a lot of mental work. Music can be used in a lot of ways to help students relax their brains and keep it active.


Every culture in the world has their own form of music. It is an ancient art form that has always existed alongside people. Humans have a special part in our brain dedicated to processing music. Our brains are specifically attuned to hear music over other environmental sounds, much like they’re attuned to speech. This suggests that music must have an important function in our lives. We often hear music at celebrations. It is a way to express joy and have fun. This joy is often also expressed through dancing. Dancing to music allows people to show how they feel through movement. By celebrating together through music, people create lasting bonds. Not all music utilize words, but all music have the capacity to share how we feel. People who make music are able to use music to express themselves. However, it is not just only the people who make music that benefit. People listening can often empathize with the music they listen to. That means that even through passive listening, people can connect.


The inclusive nature of music allows us all to take part in a communal form of art. Music connects us because it is universal. No matter where you are in the world, taking part in a musical activity with others is a sure way to bring a smile.


Barbara Korankye Boateng

Music Facilitator

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