Newtons Laws of Motion

By: Jordyn Todd

Newtons First Law: Inertia

The tendency of an abject to resist a change in motion. The greater an objects mass, the greater its inertia. Because of inertia, an object will keep doing what it is doing unless forces become unbalanced.

Example one

Vehicle restraints, such as search belts, are the the unbalanced force that stops you when a car stops suddenly so that you don't go flying out of the car.
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Example two

If pulled quickly, a tablecloth can be removed from underneath the dishes. The dishes have the tendency to remain still as long as the friction from the movement of the tablecloth is not t great
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Newton's second law: acceleration

The Acceleration of an object by a force is inversely proportional to the mass of the object and directly proportional to the force applied. The acceleration of an object depends on the mass of the object and the amount of force applied to the object. Acceleration is any change of motion; starting, stopping, speeding up , slowing down, and changing directions.

Example one

The sports car has a lot less mass so it accelerates faster, the semi-truck has much more mass than the sports car so it accelerates slower.
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Example two

in the picture below the force of the first box is 20 newtons and the second box's force is 40 newtons so the acceleration of the second box will be greater than the first box.
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Newtons third law: Action- reaction

For every reaction there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Example one

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Example two

A rocket taking off creates an action force of gasses pushing down that causes the reaction force of the rocket to go up.
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