Thiamin

Vitamin B1

What is Thiamin?

Thiamin is a B vitamin that prevents beriberi; maintains appetite and growth. Thiamin is a water soluble B vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It helps produce energy from carbohydrate on a cellular level, and is very important for nerve conduction and muscle function.






http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/nutrition/thiamine/overview.html

Side Effects :

A lack or deficiency of thiamin can cause weakness, fatigue, psychosis, and nerve damage.

Thiamin deficiency in the United States is most often seen in people who abuse alcohol (alcoholism). A lot of alcohol makes it hard for the body to absorb thiamin from foods. Unless those with alcoholism receive higher-than-normal amounts of thiamin to make up for the difference, the body will not get enough of the substance. This can lead to a disease called beriberi.

In severe thiamin deficiency, brain damage can occur. One type is called Korsakoff syndrome. The other is Wernicke's disease. Either or both of these conditions can occur in the same person.

There is no known poisoning linked to thiamin.




Food Sources :

Thiamin is found in:

  • Dried milk
  • Egg
  • Enriched bread and flour
  • Lean meats
  • Legumes
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Organ meats
  • Peas
  • Whole grains

Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables are not very high in thiamin, but when eaten in large amounts, they become a significant source.




http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/nutrition/thiamine/overview.html

Too much Thiamin :

To avoid a overdose, make sure you speak with your doctor, especially if you're pregnant before you take any sort of thiamine supplement. This includes those "stress pills" that individuals take.




http://www.smart-strength-training.com/thiamine-overdose.html