Oxygen: Wanted

Most wanted criminal!

Wanted for

Used for today:
  • inhalation of human species,

  • melting metal from ore,

  • water treatment, as an oxidizer for rocket fuel and a number of other industrial,

  • chemical and scientific applications.

  • Impurities in molten pig iron are burned away with streams of high pressure oxygen to produce steel.

  • Oxygen can also be combined with acetylene (C2H2) to produce an extremely hot flame used for welding.

  • Liquid oxygen, when combined with liquid hydrogen, makes an excellent rocket fuel.

  • Ozone (O3) forms a thin, protective layer around the earth that shields the surface from the sun's ultraviolet radiation.

Aliases

  • Chemical symbol: O

  • other names: fire air

Description


  • Colorless
  • Atomic Number: 8
    Atomic Mass: 15.9994 amu
  • Non-metal
  • Room temperature: gas
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Structure

The diagram shows that there are 8 protons, 8 neutrons, and 8 electrons in Oxygen.

First arresting officer

  • Joseph Priestley and Carl Wilhelm Scheele
  • Joseph Priestley:

8th-century English theologian, Dissenting clergyman, natural philosopher, chemist, educator, and Liberal political theorist who published over 150 works.

  • born: March 24, 1733
  • died: February 6, 1804
  • Carl Wilhelm Scheele:

a Swedish Pomeranian pharmaceutical chemist. Isaac Asimov called him "hard-luck Scheele" because he made a number of chemical discoveries before others who are generally given the credit.He heated several compounds (including potassium nitrate, manganese oxide, and mercury oxide) and found out that they released a gas which was later named Oxygen.

  • born: December 9,1742
  • died: May 21, 1786

Report of first arrest

  • Where: in 1774
  • by Joseph Priestley in England and two years earlier, but unpublished, by Carl W. Scheele in Sweden.

Last Seen

  • Group number:16
  • Located: everywhere- beware!!

Known Associates

  • compounds formed with oxygen
  • sodium peroxide-sodium burned in oxygen
  • superoxide- potassium and oxygen
  • hydrogen peroxide-hydrogen and oxygen
  • carbon dioxide

Warning Label

generally stable...

Citations

  • "Chemical Elements.com - An Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements." Chemical Elements.com - An Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2015.
  • "The Periodic Table." Periodic Table of Elements and Chemistry. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2015.
  • "Periodic Table and the Elements." Chem4Kids.com: Elements & Periodic Table. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2015.
  • Http://www.rsc.org/periodic-table. N.p., n.d. Web.
  • "EXPEDITION SCYLLIAS : CHASSEURS D'EPAVES !" EXPEDITION SCYLLIAS : CHASSEURS D'EPAVES ! N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Sept. 2015.
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This picture is a prime example of oxygen being in use. These scuba divers are using oxygen to breathe under water. Oxygen can be found almost anywhere, for it is all around us. However, it is very hard to catch.