Climate Hot Map

Hotspots

  1. Piedmont, NC, USA

  • More than 350,000 cases of poison ivy are reported annually in the United States.

  • Approximately 80 percent of people are allergic to urushiol, the oil produced by poison ivy.

  • At the levels of carbon dioxide expected by mid-century, poison ivy grows twice as fast and produces a more toxic urushiol than it does at current carbon dioxide levels.

2) British Columbia, Canada

  • Temperatures in the interior mountain ranges of British Columbia have risen faster than the global average, particularly during the winter.

  • By 2010 the mountain pine beetle had killed almost 24.5 billion cubic feet (692 million cubic meters) of timber since scientists began tracking the infestation in 1999. That is more than nine times the allowable annual timber cut in British Columbia.

  • The beetles have now managed to cross the Continental Divide, threatening the jack pine forests that reach across the continent to the East Coast of Canada and the United States.

3) Rocky Mountains, CO, USA

  • From 2009 to 2010, mountain pine beetle activity increased more than 10-fold infesting 200,000 acres (80,000 hectares) on the Front Range—mountains at the foot of the Rockies close to towns and cities.

  • By 2010 the mountain pine beetle had killed almost 24.5 billion cubic feet (692 million cubic meters) of timber since scientists began tracking the infestation in 1999. That is more than nine times the allowable annual timber cut in British Columbia.

  • By killing off millions of acres (hectares) of trees in North America, the mountain pine beetle has turned infested lodgepole and ponderosa pine forests into a source of atmospheric carbon as the trees die, decay, and at times become a tinderbox for wildfires.

4) Heligoland, Germany

  • Nearly two-fifths of the first spring arrival dates of birds in Europe and North America in the second half the twentieth century occurred significantly earlier than historically, while only 2 percent occurred significantly later.

  • Scientists found that warmer temperatures correlated with earlier arrival of small migratory songbirds at Heligoland, Germany, and other sites across northern Europe.

  • The effects of global warming in Germany are not limited to birds. Ten spring phases of flowering and leaf unfolding occurred on average 1.6 days earlier each decade in the second half of the twentieth century.

Impacts

  • forced migrations and extinctions

  • increase in agricultural pests

  • interruption in life cycle events

  • changing woodlands

  • increase in allergens and noxious plants

Solutions

  • energy efficiency
  • electricity from renewable energy
  • coal emissions reductions
  • better vehicles- cleaner fuels & smarter travel
  • assistance for developing countries