CSA ~ September 3, 2020

Weekly & Bi-Weekly Shares

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If you find you can't make it during the pick up time, please let us know and we can

arrange a Friday visit. If you are not feeling well, we can bring your share out to your

car to facilitate social distancing. Just give us a call at 330-549-9408.


Have any CSA news you want to tell us about or would you like to suggest a recipe?

Contact us online by replying to these email updates or email jlynch02@gmail.com.

As always, thank you for supporting Goodness Grows!

In This Week's Share

Flowers

Tomatillos

Grape & Cherry Tomatoes

Atomic Grape Tomatoes

Get Stuffed Tomato

Beefsteak & Roma Tomatoes

Oregano

Carrots

Turnips

Ground Cherries

Purple Basil

Leeks

Pears & Grapes (From our client Ethan's farm. These grapes have seeds.)


Number of crops ready and amount of harvest of a given crop will vary throughout the season. We will provide at least six items each week. If we have any crop issues, we will supplement with produce from other local farms. Some weeks will include value added items, such as Jungle Jam, Zucchini Bread, or Fresh Basil Pesto.

Tips & Recipe Ideas

Purple Basil

No fridge, please! Purple Basil is happiest at room temperature, hanging out in your kitchen. (Basil turns black or develops black spots in the cold.) Try these fresh ideas for how to use it quickly.


1) Whip up a purple basil lemonade. Just add 1/4 ounce of packed purple basil leaves to any lemonade. Add a spring on top for garnish.

2) Make an infused olive oil. First let the purple basil wilt on a paper towel for a hour or two until it looks droopy and the water has come out. Place the herbs in a sterilized mason jar and top with a quality olive oil. Cover the herb by at least 1-2″ of oil. Place oil in sun and let infuse for 4-6 weeks. It’s great if you can shake the herbs in oil daily during this time. Then strain the herbs and place in a clean sterilized jar for use in salad dressing, in a marinade, dipping oil … the possibilities are endless! (And you will love the purple color this gives to the oil!)

3) Make an infused vinegar. Directions are the same as making oil above, but replace the oil with a premium vinegar. (A nice white wine vinegar is great!) Great for making salad dressings and marinades or make it as a gift! If you really want to spice things up, add a stick of cinnamon with the purple basil. (Purple basil and cinnamon are a great flavor combination.) Source: https://www.thatstasty.com/product/purple-basil/


More Purple Basil Ideas:

—Add it to a white bean salad with some red peppers and green onions.

—Throw it into a pot of beans, tomatoes, potatoes, zucchini, and onion.

—Put it in a red sauce made from fresh tomatoes.

—Garnish anything that the flavor of basil will complement.

—Stir into a slaw of chopped carrots, fennel bulb, and garlic just before serving.

Source: http://www.farmgirlfare.com/2008/06/purple-basil-pesto-easiest-white-bean.html

Pears

These farm fresh pears aren't the prettiest, but they will be perfect to cut up for a recipe! There are some great ideas in this article below. The title is a link to take you to the entire article, only part of which we have included here.


Five Uses For An Ugly Pear

Posted on September 29, 2009 by Virginia Citrano

Let’s face it: While organic produce is tops in taste, it sometimes comes up short in the beauty department. And since we are a culture trained to prize beauty, that can mean that we too often pass on the better fruits and vegetables.


The pears that we have been getting in our shares aren’t the prettiest pears I’ve ever seen. But their flavor is fabulous. So to help you over pretty fruit syndrome, I’ll give you my five best ways to use an ugly pear:


1. Pear Puree: Easy-peasey lemon squeezey, as my younger son likes to say. Peel the pears, put them in a saucepan with a quarter cup of water over low heat, and let them slowly soften. Puree in a Cuisinart or with a stick blender. I combine the pear puree with other pureed fruits when I make fruit leather in my food dehydrator. You can also make a Bellini with it.


Click the ugly pear title to see the other 4 uses! The article also includes links to other recipes.

Tomatoes

There are so many creative uses for tomatoes! (I like a tomato sandwich on good bakery bread, with just a touch of mayo and salt and pepper.) The link below has some quick and easy ideas, like Burst Tomatoes - "Hot pan, a little oil, a bunch of cherry tomatoes or other small-ish specimens, a sprinkle of salt, a few shakes of the pan and voilà!" No-Cook Pasta Sauce -

"In a large bowl combine several chopped tomatoes, a clove or two of minced garlic, salt, and pepper to taste. Add olive oil to coat tomatoes. Add hot pasta and toss to coat pasta. Add more olive oil, if you like." And more...

Oregano

Oregano is a fragrant herb related to mint, guaranteed to add a pop of flavor to any recipe.


Oregano + Chicken: Roasted, baked, poached or grilled — any way you want to cook your chicken, oregano can make it taste even better. Whisk minced oregano into a marinade or stuff whole sprigs inside the chicken before roasting.

Herbed Dinner Rolls: I love the flavor (and aroma!) of this herb when baked into a soft yeasted roll, either by itself or with other fresh herbs. Finely mince a few tablespoons and knead them right into the bread dough.

Burger Seasoning: You’ll get a brighter, fresher flavor if you use oregano from the garden instead of from the spice jar when making your burgers. A tablespoon or two worked into the ground meat will have your party guests wondering what your secret ingredient might be.

Oregano + Beans: This is a match made in heaven. Chop up a few tablespoons of fresh oregano and add it to a pot of home-cooked beans in the last fifteen minutes or so of cooking. Your entire pot will be infused with that earthy oregano flavor.

Oregano Pesto: Basil isn’t the only herb in the garden when it comes to pesto! Oregano makes a particularly robust and savory pesto. Try drizzling it over a salad, tossing it with roasted vegetables, or brushing it over flatbreads.

Source: https://www.thekitchn.com/5-ways-to-use-fresh-oregano-from-your-garden-ingredient-spotlight-191094