Stimulant Drugs

how they are used and abused

Definition of Stimulants

Stimulants (also referred to as psychostimulants) are psychoactive drugs that induce temporary improvements in either mental or physical functions or both. Stimulants produce a variety of different kinds of effects by enhancing the activity of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common effects, which vary depending on the substance and dosage in question, may include enhanced alertness, awareness, wakefulness, endurance, productivity, and motivation, increased arousal, locomotion, heart rate, and blood pressure, and the perception of a diminished requirement for food and sleep.

names and nicknames

Amphetamines

Atomoxetine (Strattera)

Benzphetamine (Didrex)

Caffeine (NoDoz, Vivarin)

Cocaine

Dexmethylphenidate (Focalin)

Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine)

Diethylpropion (Tenuate)

Methamphetamines

Methylphenidate (Concerta; Metadate ER; Metadate CD)

Modafinil (Provigil)

Nicotinev

Pemoline (Cylert)

Phendimetrizine (Bontril SR, Prelu-2)

Phentermine (Fastin, Ionamin)

Sibutramine (Meridia)

Theobromine

Xanthine

3. Nicknames/Street names of drugs from this category

Coke

Flake

Snow

Blow

White

Toot

Base

Basa

Powder

Smack

Big Rush

Pearl

Candy

Cola

C

Big flakes

Nose candy

Baseball

Bump

Line

Rail

Snow

Stash

Yeyo

Effects

Poor judgment


Flexibility


Impulsivity

Why do people get involved with these drugs

Stimulants are used for their euphoric effects and/or to counteract the depressant effects of tranquilizers or alcohol. They have only limited medical application. In Canada, for example, they are used in the treatment of narcolepsy, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Parkinson’s Disease, and have had some very limited use in the treatment of obesity

use of them in Iowa

United States produces 88 percent of the world's legal amphetamine.

Adderall, a combination of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, is known as the "study drug." It is used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy.

Increases attention and decreases restlessness in patients who are overactive, cannot concentrate for very long, or are easily distracted and have unstable emotions.

There has been a significant increase in accommodations requests for adderall at the Student Disability Resources Office on campus.

11.4 percent of young people ages 12-25 used prescriptions drugs non-medically within the past year in 2010.

Full-time college students between ages of 18-22, were found to be twice as likely to abuse Adderall than those of the same age and not in college.

30 to 40 percent of those who have it, misuse it, or divert the medication at some time.

When abused, Adderall can be extremely addictive.

In addition to having the potential of becoming addictive, common side effects of the drug include lack of appetite, increased blood pressure, headache, dry mouth, inability to fall asleep and weight loss. For many people, they may not experience significant adverse side effects every time they use it.

the National Survey on Drug Use and Health in 2010 found that full-time college students abusing Adderall were three times more likely to have used marijuana in the past year than those of the same age not in college.

The same group was also five times more likely to have used painkillers non-medically and 90 percent were reported binge drinkers while more than 50 percent were reported to be heavy drinkers.