Dance

By: Kadyn Moore

Brief Description

Many animals have mate-selection courtship rituals. Animal courtship may involve complicated dances or touching, vocalizations, or displays of beauty or fighting prowess. One animal whose courtship rituals are well studied is the bowerbird, whose male builds a "bower" of collected objects. Another is the Great Crested Grebe, whose courtship dances were first described by Julian Huxley. In cases like the Great Crested Grebe, the pairs form life or at least long-lasting partnerships. In that case there are also pair-bonding dances throughout the mating season, and through the whole period of raising the young. If pairs get separated, there are exceptionally vigorous dances when they come together. There are a number of "dance routines", which occur in the different circumstances of life. All this behaviour is inherited, though the individual bird remembers the place and the partner permanently.

Example

Flamingo is an example of a bird that dances to mate. It looks like they are prancing around with there heads held high.
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Example

Sea Horses would be a good example because they are wrapping each other together to look like they are doing a dance.
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Example

Jelly fish are a good example by jumping up and down and waving there arms all around.
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Example

Swans are a good example for dancing to mate because the male and female combine together by putting there necks together and it makes a heart shape.
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