The First Telephone

Alexander Graham Bell

The first Telephone

The first telephone was was invented in 1876 by an inventor,scientist, and an engineer-er by the name of Alexander Graham Bell. Alexander's parents were a huge part of his life and his invention. Both of Graham Bell's parents were deaf. With them being deaf and him being both a scientist and a inventor Alexander was researching the way of hearing and speech. This lead up to him inventing a hearing device later called the telephone. He started off with a harmonic telegraph. Using the phonautograph. The phonautograph was a machine that would draw the shapes of the sound waves on a smoke covered glass. This lead him to many ideas. His invention started to become much more popular in 1874. After telling his idea of making multiple signals on a telegraph wire which would save a great amount of money of making more electrical lines. Alexander did not have all the knowledge or tools yet to do this but a mechanic at an electrical shop helped him with the information he needed. Alexander and his assistant Thomas Watson had tried an acoustic telegraph. Watson had accidentally hit a wire and this had showed Bell that he had only needed one wire. His hypothesis had worked. This had led to a powered telephone. Voice like sounds could be sent through but not a clear speech.


How the telephone evolved...


In 1874, when Alexander had made the telephone one wired only voice sounds could be made out. On January 30, 1877 the telephone had been replaced with a magnet bar instead of a double electromagnet. This increased the magnetic field. Telephones were now able to make out clear speeches, yet they were faint but they were clear.


How the telephone works...


The telephone consists of a bar magnet, fine wire, a microphone, a ringer and a disc of iron. The sound waves are converted to electrical signals by a transmitter. Using gray's design the liquid transmitter made the telephone complete. The diaphragms vibration made the needle in the water make vibrations to send electrical signals through.

New Telephone Innovations in the Early 1960s