Child Labor Laws

by: Joshua Bingham

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Child Labor Laws

Child Labor Laws are laws that govern child labor. It protects children from being used in a dangerous workplace, and being paid below minimum wage. Each state has its own branch of laws that govern child labor.



In Georgia minors below the age of 16 cannot work during school hours, they can't work more than 4 hours on a school day, 8 hours on a non-school day, and 40 hours in a non-school week. 16 year olds may work full time, has to pay income taxes, and must work in a "safe" establishment. 16 year olds can work at a job that sales cigarettes, or alcohol.


In Tennessee children are allowed to start working at the age of 14. When school is in session they can work no more than 3 hours per day, can work no more than 18 hours a week, and can work no later than 7:00 p.m. When school is not in session they can work no more than 8 hours a day, can work no more than 40 hours per week, and can work no later than 9:00 p.m.

There is no restrictions for 16 or 17 year olds.


Canada does not have Federal child labor laws. Some districts in Canada have wide variety of child labor laws.



The Mexican Constitution provides that the State has the duty to promote respect for the dignity of all children and the full exercise of their rights. It also provides that children have the right to satisfy their nutritional, health, educational, and recreational needs. Several laws have been enacted in order to implement this mandate, most importantly the federal Law on the Protection of the Rights of Children and Adolescents. In addition, Mexico is a signatory to several treaties that impact children’s rights.