Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Solutions

What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), is caused by a violently disturbing event, and is an anxiety disorder. People get an image in their mind of what happened that will not escape. According to “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”, on the The National Institute of Mental Health website, getting or seeing others get hurt can cause you to feel a weakness, hurting your social side. Wars, car crashes, natural disasters and even seeing other people go through traumatic events can trigger PTSD. PTSD is an anxiety disorder and can cause people to feel stress and anxiety even when there are no threats and no danger around them. Medications are not able to cure PTSD. Although you can take medications to reduce symptoms, doctors also suggest therapy too.

Therapies

Exposure therapy

Due to PTSD, exposure therapy is one of the therapies someone can go through. No therapy is guaranteed to work because everyone is different. However, exposure therapy can help control the anxiety a person has. The exposure therapy doctors try to recreate what the person went through, while having the person face their fear. In the article “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”, on the The National Institute of Mental Health website, people talk through the traumatic event, hoping to cope and feel no pressure about the danger, or sadness they felt.

Cognitive Restructuring Therapy

Another therapy people with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder can go through is cognitive restructuring. Doctors help make people look in a practical way, at what actually happened. According to “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”, on the The National Institute of Mental Health website, the bad memories from the tragic event are made sense of during the cognitive restructuring therapy. The perspective of one person’s memories from a traumatic event can be different from another person’s memories from the same event. In the article “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder”, on the The National Institute of Mental Health website, some people think they are guilty of something when really they are not guilty.


Works Cited

Information Source 1

"Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder." NIMH RSS. National Institute of Mental Health, n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2016.

Information Source 2

Kahn, Ada P. "post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)." Health Reference Center. Facts On File,

Inc. Web. 3 Feb. 2016.

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