Changes & Properties

Isabell Faydalla and Denise Ray

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Physical Property

A Physical Property is any property that is measurable, who's value describes a state of a physical system.

Physical Property Examples


  • Absorption of electromagnetic - The way a photon’s energy is taken up by matter
  • Absorption (physical) - Absorption between two forms of matter
  • Albedo - Reflecting power of a surface
  • Angular momentum - The amount of rotation of an object
  • Area - Amount of a two dimensional surface in a plane
  • Brittleness - Tendency of a material to break under stress
  • Boiling point - Temperature where a liquid forms vapor
  • Capacitance - Ability of an object to store an electrical charge
  • Color - Hue of an object as perceived by humans
  • Concentration - Amount of one substance in a mixture
  • Density - Mass per unit volume of a substance
  • Dielectric constant - Storage and dissipation of electric and magnetic energy
  • Ductility - Ability of a substance to be stretched into a wire
  • Distribution - Number of particles per unit volume in single-particle phase space
  • Efficacy - Capacity to produce an effect
  • Elasticity - Tendency of a material to return to its former shape
  • Electric charge - Positive or negative electric charge of matter
  • Electrical conductivity - A material's ability to conduct electricity
  • Electrical impedance - Ratio of voltage to AC
  • Electrical resistivity - How strongly a flow of electric current is opposed
  • Electric field - Made by electrically charged particles and time-varying magnetic fields.
  • Electric potential - Potential energy of a charged particle divided by the charge
  • Emission - Spectrum of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation emitted
  • Flexibility - Pliability
  • Flow rate - Amount of fluid which passes through a surface per unit time.
  • Fluidity - Flows easily
  • Freezing point - Temperature where a liquid solidifies
  • Frequency - Number of repetitions in a given time frame
  • Hardness - How resistant solid matter is to external force
  • Inductance - When the current changes, the conductor creates voltage
  • Intrinsic impedance - Ratio of electric and magnetic fields in an electromagnetic wave
  • Intensity - Power transferred per unit area
  • Irradiance - Power of electromagnetic radiation per unit area
  • Length - Longest dimension of an object
  • Location - Place where something exists
  • Luminance - Amount of light that passes through a given area
  • Luminescence - Emission of light not resulting from heat
  • Luster - The way light interacts with the surface of a crystal, mineral or rock
  • Malleability - Ability to form a thin sheet by hammering or rolling a material
  • Magnetic moment - Force that the magnet exerts on electric currents and the torque that a magnetic field exerts on it
  • Mass - An object's resistance to being accelerated
  • Melting point - Temperature where a solid changes to a liquid
  • Momentum - Product of the mass and velocity of an object
  • Permeability - Ability of a material to support a magnetic field
  • Smell - Scent or odor of a substance
  • Solubility - Ability of a substance to dissolve
  • Specific heat - Heat capacity per unit mass of a material
  • Temperature - Numerical measure of heat and cold
  • Thermal conductivity - Property of a material to conduct heat
  • Velocity - Rate of change in the position of an object
  • Viscosity - Resistance to deformation by stress
  • Volume - Space that a substance occupies

Now you have seen many different examples of physical properties. Remember, what all they have in common is that they can be measured.



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Chemical Property

A Chemical Property is a property or characteristic of a substance that is observed during a reaction in which the chemical composition or identity of the substance is changed

Chemical Property Examples

  • Chemical properties can only be established by changing a substance’s chemical identity, and are different from physical properties, which can be observed by viewing or touching a sample.

    The internal qualities of a substance must be altered to determine its chemical properties. For example:

    • Flammability - How easily something will burn or ignite, is a chemical property because you can’t tell just by looking at something how easily it will burn. Fire testing is done to determine how difficult or easy it will be to get a certain material to burn.

    Information about flammability is used in building codes, fire codes, insurance requirements, and storing, handling, and transporting highly flammable materials.

    • Heat of Combustion - This chemical property is the amount of energy that is released as heat when a substance is burned with oxygen.

    Examples of this chemical property is a calorie which converts to energy within the body and the amount of heat generated by the burning of various fuels.

    • Toxicity - How much a substance can damage an animal, plant, cell, organ, or other organism is its toxicity. Materials with the chemical property of toxicity include lead, chlorine gas, hydrofluoric acid, and mercury. Toxicity is measured by how the lead, chlorine gas, mercury, or other substance affects the organism – basically, by how much damage it does to the organism and how quickly that damage occurs.
    For example, lead is a toxic substance that can damage various parts of the human body, including bones, the heart, kidneys, intestines, and the nervous and reproductive systems.
    • Ability to oxidize - This is what takes place by gaining oxygen, losing hydrogen, or losing electrons, and is a chemical property that results in the oxidation number of a substance being changed. An example of this is rust. Over time, iron and steel (which is made of iron) will rust. However, they will rust more quickly if they are combined with pure oxygen.

    Examples of oxidation include the way an apple turns brown after it has been cut, the way a penny turns green, and the way a fender on a car can become rusty.

    • Radioactivity - The emission of radiation from an atom with an unstable nucleus, is a chemical property. On the periodic table of elements, the elements that have no stable isotopes are considered radioactive.

    Some of the most radioactive elements are hydrogen, beryllium, carbon, calcium, cobalt, zinc and iron.

    • Chemical stability - This chemical property in a given environment, also referred to as thermodynamic stability of a chemical system, refers to the stability that takes place when a chemical system is in its lowest energy state – a state of chemical equilibrium, or balance, with its environment.

    This equilibrium will last indefinitely unless something happens to change the system.

    • Half-life - This chemical property is the amount of time it will take for half of the original substance to decay. It is used in nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics to describe the time required for half of the unstable radioactive atoms in a sample to experience radioactive decay.

    Each of these are chemical properties. Now you can better understand what a chemical property is.


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Physical Change

A Physical Change is any change not involving a change in the substances chemical identity.

Physical Change Examples

No new chemical species forms in a physical change. Changing state of a pure substance between solid, liquid, and gas phases of matter are all physical changes, since the identity of the matter does not change.

  • crumpling a sheet of aluminum foil
  • melting an ice cube
  • casting silver in a mold
  • breaking a bottle
  • boiling water
  • evaporating alcohol
  • shredding paper
  • sublimation of dry ice into carbon dioxide vapor

Chemical Changes

A chemical change is any change that results in the formation of new chemical substances.
Rotting Apple (Mould)

Chemical Change Examples

  • Absorption of electromagnetic - The way a photon’s energy is taken up by matter
  • Absorption (physical) - Absorption between two forms of matter
  • Albedo - Reflecting power of a surface
  • Angular momentum - The amount of rotation of an object
  • Area - Amount of a two dimensional surface in a plane
  • Brittleness - Tendency of a material to break under stress
  • Boiling point - Temperature where a liquid forms vapor
  • Capacitance - Ability of an object to store an electrical charge
  • Color - Hue of an object as perceived by humans
  • Concentration - Amount of one substance in a mixture
  • Density - Mass per unit volume of a substance
  • Dielectric constant - Storage and dissipation of electric and magnetic energy
  • Ductility - Ability of a substance to be stretched into a wire
  • Distribution - Number of particles per unit volume in single-particle phase space
  • Efficacy - Capacity to produce an effect
  • Elasticity - Tendency of a material to return to its former shape
  • Electric charge - Positive or negative electric charge of matter
  • Electrical conductivity - A material's ability to conduct electricity
  • Electrical impedance - Ratio of voltage to AC
  • Electrical resistivity - How strongly a flow of electric current is opposed
  • Electric field - Made by electrically charged particles and time-varying magnetic fields.
  • Electric potential - Potential energy of a charged particle divided by the charge
  • Emission - Spectrum of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation emitted
  • Flexibility - Pliability
  • Flow rate - Amount of fluid which passes through a surface per unit time.
  • Fluidity - Flows easily
  • Freezing point - Temperature where a liquid solidifies
  • Frequency - Number of repetitions in a given time frame
  • Hardness - How resistant solid matter is to external force
  • Inductance - When the current changes, the conductor creates voltage
  • Intrinsic impedance - Ratio of electric and magnetic fields in an electromagnetic wave
  • Intensity - Power transferred per unit area
  • Irradiance - Power of electromagnetic radiation per unit area
  • Length - Longest dimension of an object
  • Location - Place where something exists
  • Luminance - Amount of light that passes through a given area
  • Luminescence - Emission of light not resulting from heat
  • Luster - The way light interacts with the surface of a crystal, mineral or rock
  • Malleability - Ability to form a thin sheet by hammering or rolling a material
  • Magnetic moment - Force that the magnet exerts on electric currents and the torque that a magnetic field exerts on it
  • Mass - An object's resistance to being accelerated
  • Melting point - Temperature where a solid changes to a liquid
  • Momentum - Product of the mass and velocity of an object
  • Permeability - Ability of a material to support a magnetic field
  • Smell - Scent or odor of a substance
  • Solubility - Ability of a substance to dissolve
  • Specific heat - Heat capacity per unit mass of a material
  • Temperature - Numerical measure of heat and cold
  • Thermal conductivity - Property of a material to conduct heat
  • Velocity - Rate of change in the position of an object
  • Viscosity - Resistance to deformation by stress
  • Volume - Space that a substance occupies

Now you have seen many different examples of physical properties. Remember, what all they have in common is that they can be measured.


Read more at http://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-physical-properties.html#ArDc3qJDk4tZzZJc.99