Ecology Scavenger Hunt

By: Akshat Sharma and Tarun Gunnabathula

Producer

The tree Akshat is pointing to is a producer. The tree is a producer because the tree uses its leaves to gather the sunlight coming off the sun to produce its own food, henceforth becoming a producer.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/28/15)

Primary consumer

The ladybug is a primary consumer, as it is the first trophic level in a food chain. The ladybug is the primary consumer as it eats the producer first and starts the trophic chain.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/20/15)

Secondary Consumer

The duck is an example of the secondary consumer, as the crow eats small insects. The duck eats small insects, snails, and other small animals that eat producers.


Image: Taken by Akshat at the Valley Ranch canal (4/30/15)

Tertiary consumer

An example of a tertiary consumer would be the Shark (specifically the Great White). The Great White consumes larger animals, such as seals. These seals consume smaller fish, which end up consuming plankton and other producers. This ends up making the Great White a tertiary consumer.


Image Credits: Jrank.org (5/6/15)

Quaternary Consumer

A quaternary consumer would be the hawk. Hawks consume snakes, which are tertiary consumers. Snakes consume mice, which are secondary consumers. Mice consume grasshoppers, which are primary consumers. Finally, grasshoppers consume producers, such as sunflowers. This classifies the hawk as the 4th consumer up the food chain.


Image Credits: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/ (5/5/15)

Decomposer

The decomposers in this biome are mushrooms that are fungi. The mushrooms are the organisms that decompose.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/20/15)

Mutualism

The bee and the flower have a mutualistic relationship, meaning that the relationship benefits both of them. The bee obtains food from the nectar of the plant while the flower has its pollen spread about by the bee.


Image Credits: http://info.nhpr.org/ (5/6/15)

Commensalism

The Egret and cattle (horse as well) have a communalistic relationship. As the cattle move around, the insects around it become more active, allowing the Egret to prey upon them. This does not harm or benefit the cow in any way.


Image Credits: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ (5/6/15)

Parasitism

The relationship between the mosquito and human is parasitic because only the mosquito benefits. The mosquito obtains blood from the human, and the human has no benefit, only the loss of blood and nutrients.


Image Credits: http://en.wikipedia.org/ (5/16/15)

Predator-Prey Relationship

In this relationship, the predator is the lion and the prey is the zebra. The lion hunts the zebra while the zebra is the one that gets eaten.


Image Credits; http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ (5/6/15)

Autotroph

The plant is an autotroph because the plant produces its own food through photosynthesis.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/17/15)

Heterotroph

The crow is a heterotroph, as it cannot produce its own food. It must consume other organisms to sustain itself.


Image: Taken by Tarun at the Valley Ranch canal (4/17/15)

Uniform DIspersion

Uniform dispersion occurs when the population is (relatively) equally spaced out. This example of the Emperor Penguins has the organisms in evenly spaced lines (for the most part), making it uniform.


Image Credits: http://bio1152.nicerweb.com (5/16/15)

Random Dispersion

Random dispersion means that the population is dispersed randomly. These flowers in the field are spread just like that. They have no real pattern in their growth areas, making it random.


Image Credits: http://bio1152.nicerweb.com (5/16/15)

Clustered Dispersion

This type of dispersion occurs when organisms are bunched up in groups that are scattered around rather than being evenly spaced or alone.


Image: Taken by Akshat at the Valley Ranch canal (4/17/15)

Density Dependent Factor

A density dependent factor is one that depends on the density, or concentration, of the organisms in an area. This herd of sheep could have disease as a density dependent factor as disease can be transmitted faster through closer contact, which is what usually happens in larger populations.


Image Credits: http://classroom.synonym.com (5/16/15)

Density Independent Factor

In a density-independent factor, the concentration of the populations and communities does not affect the factor. Floods are a factor that do not depend on how many organisms are living in an area.


Image Credits: http://drb-biology2011.wikispaces.com (5/16/15)

Competition

Competition is when organisms fight food limited things, such as food, shelter, and resources. In this picture, the birds and the prairie dog are fighting for the one peanut, which is a limited food.


Image: photolabels.co (1/30/15)

Water Cycle

The water cycle is a cycle that takes place in the clouds, and a cycle that never dies out. The water is reused over and over again and is purified as it goes through the cycle. In this picture, the clouds are collecting water vapor, which will eventually precipitate down to the ground again.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/20/15)

Carbon Cycle

The carbon cycle is the flow of carbon throughout the world. One main sources of carbon in the cycle are industrial factories, like the one shown above, that emit C02 as a waste.


Image Credits: http://www.businessdailyafrica.com (5/6/15)

Nitrogen cycle

The nitrogen cycle is the flow of nitrogen throughout our world. The nitrogen-fixing bacteria (found in these nodes) make nitrogen gas into usable compounds in the soil for plants


Image Credits: Indiana Public Media (5/6/15)

Secondary Succession

Secondary succession will take place after this forest fire occurs, and some of the biodiversity dies out. After Secondary Succession takes place the biodiversity will be restored.


Image Credits: http://en.wikipedia.org (5/6/15)

Biome

This forest is a biome, because it contains a lot of biomass and biodiversity of organisms.


Image: Taken by Akshat at Trevor-Reese Jones Scout Camp (4/18/15)

Air pollution

The car is an example of air pollution, as they back pipe of the car is releasing dangerous compounds that can cause diseases. The car has a back pipe that releases compounds that releases bad compounds into the air, therefore polluting it.


Image: Taken by Tarun in Coppell (5/14/15)

Water pollution

The car is an example of air pollution, as they back pipe of the car is releasing dangerous compounds that can cause diseases. The car has a back pipe that releases compounds that releases toxic compounds into the air, therefore polluting it.


Image: Taken by Tarun at the Valley Ranch canal (5/6/15)

Greenhouse effect

The greenhouse effect is the entrapment of the Sun’s radiation by “greenhouse gases” in our atmosphere (like C02). The radiation is then spread and goes off in many directions. This radiation itself originates from the sun.


Cred: Wikimedia (5/6/14)

Land pollution

This is land pollution, as the boxing materials of the "Mike and Ikes" is polluting the nature and is a threat to the biodiversity that will eat it.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (5/6/15)

Renewable Resource

The wood is a renewable resource, as many trees can make a renewable resource, wood. The wood can be renewable because the trees can be regrown.


Image: Taken by Akshat at CHS (5/6/14)

Water Pollution

This is an example of water pollution as the water in our world is being toxified because the biodiversity in the water is being harmed.


Image: Taken by Akshat at the Valley Ranch canal (5/6/15)

Non-Renewable Resource

Plastic is a non-renewable resource as we cannot find or plant more of it and there is a limited amount of plastic.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (5/5/15)

Cause of Extinction


The trees are becoming more extinct and are dying because humans are killing trees by over logging them, henceforth, human logging can be a cause of extinction for trees.


Image: Taken by Tarun at the Valley Ranch canal (5/6/15)

Invasive Species

The weed is an invasive species. It blocks out the sun for many types of grass and small plants. The weed is able to spread around as no other organism primarily consumes weeds. This allows the weed to spread further and further.


Image: Taken by Tarun at the Valley Ranch canal (5/6/15)

Algal Bloom


This picture of algal blooms was taken outside in the school near the window. The algae bloomed suddenly across the edge of the school. As the soil we used is full of nutrients, too much.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/18/15)

Omnivore


Brett is an omnivore, as his system of organs can handle meat and vegetables. Brett is an omnivore because Brett eats meat and vegetable.


Image: Taken by Tarun at CHS (4/18/15)

Herbivore

The goose is a herbivore as it is a system of organs can only handle grass and other plants.The goose is a herbivore because it only eats producers, henceforth making it a herbivore.


Image: Taken by Akshat at Trevor-Resse Scout Camp (4/17/15)

Carnivore

This dog is a carnivore, as it only wants meats, henceforth making it carnivorous. The dog is carnivorous because it’s systems functions best when eating meat.


Image: Taken by Tarun In Valley Ranch (5/6/15)

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