Transplant Surgeon

By : Elijah J. Hendeerson

Transplant Surgoen

A transplant surgeon is a board-certified surgeon who specializes in the transplantation of bodily organs, such as kidney, liver, pancreas or heart. A career in transplant surgery can be one of the most rewarding in the medical field, with its focus on utilizing renewable biological resources to save lives. Most transplant surgeons work in hospitals or medical centers as part of transplant or internal medicine programs and are trained in the evaluation of living donors, the removal and preservation of viable organs from cadavers, and the post-operative care of transplant patients, says the Association of Women Surgeons (www.aws.org).


  1. Another name is added to the national transplant waiting list every 10 minutes.
  2. On average, 22 people die every day from the lack of available organs for transplant.
  3. Over 650,000 have occurred in the U.S. since 1988
  4. It is estimated that nearly 30,000 patients began new lives in 2015 thanks to organ transplants (from 8,500 deceased and 6,000 living donors).
  5. About 58% of patients awaiting lifesaving transplants are minorities.
  6. Another person is added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list every 10 minutes.
  7. Sadly, 8,000 people die each year – 22 people each day – because the organs they need are not donated in time.
  8. A single tissue donor can help more than 50 people.
  9. 48,000 patients have their sight restored through corneal transplants each year.
  10. More than 33% of all deceased donors are age 50 or older; more than 5% are age 65 or older.
  11. More than 121 million people, approximately 51% of the U.S. adult population, are registered organ, eye and tissue donors
  12. About 58% of patients awaiting lifesaving transplants are minorities
  13. Another person is added to the nation’s organ transplant waiting list every 10 minutes
  14. 48,000 patients have their sight restored through corneal transplants each year.
  15. The average waiting time for a kidney from a deceased donor is 3 to 5 years.
  16. A kidney from a living donor offers patients an alternative to years of dialysis and time on the national transplant waiting list*.
  17. 1 in 9 or 26 million Americans have kidney disease – and most don’t even know it.
  18. Organ recipients are selected based primarily on medical need, location and compatibility.
  19. One deceased donor can save up to eight lives through organ donation and can save and enhance more than 100 lives through the lifesaving and healing gift of tissue donation.
  20. Currently, more than 120,000 men , women, and children are awaiting organ transplants in the United States.