Anne Frank

A Holocaust Victim

Early Life

Anne Frank was born in June 12, 1929, in Frankfurt, Germany. Otto, her father, was the son of wealthy parents. He attended the classical gymnasium and served as lieutenant of the German army in WWl. "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016.

Forced into Hiding

Following the Nazi takeover of Germany in January of 1933, the Franks moved to Amsterdam, in which Otto became the manager of a food company with a warehouse and office on the Prinsengracht, one of the city's canal/streets. Frank attended the Montessori school in Amsterdam. When the Nazis occupied Holland in May 1940, they began to institute anti-Jewish regulations, which forced Frank to leave her school. "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016.

Diary

July of 1942, about a month after Frank received her diary, she and her family, along with four other Jews, went into hiding from the Nazis. Living in the cramped attic space above her father's business office in Amsterdam, Frank's coming of age is recorded in the pages of her diary."Anne(lies)Frank." People of the Holocaust. Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016. The Nazis found her Diary and scattered the pages, later to be found by Elli Vossen and Miep van Santen, which were given to Otto when he returned to Amsterdam.

Getting Involved

Anne Frank began writing a Diary and recorded the life and struggles of being part of the Holocaust. As she went hiding, her father had given her a Diary to record her adventures during the event. Finding this Diary let everyone knew just how destructive and heartbreaking the event was.

Choices and Results

Two years before the Diary was published, Otto got his hands on it. At first he was shocked and amazed at what he read. He, like many others, including former teachers, had never suspected that his daughter possessed such a deep, insightful mind. Also, the content of some of the entries concerning Anne's relationship with her mother were thought to be of too private a nature to share. Typed copies of this edited diary made the rounds of friends in Amsterdam, who finally convinced Otto Frank to publish the diary. Lady Eleanor Roosevelt titled it as a "remarkable book." Anne's diary is an appropriate monument to her spirit and to the spirits of those who have worked and are working still for peace. The novelist and historian Frederic Morton commented in the New York Times Book Review that the diary may well be "the single most enduring thing to be born during the entire course of the Nazi nightmare." "Anne(lies Marie) Frank." Major Authors and Illustrators for Children and Young Adults. Detroit: Gale, 2002. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

In His/Her Words

As you can easily imagine we often ask ourselves here despairingly: "What, oh, what is the use of the war? Why can't people live peacefully together? Why all this destruction?"

The question is very understandable, but no one has found a satisfactory answer to it so far. Yes, why do they make still more gigantic planes (in England), still heavier bombs and, at the same time, prefabricated houses for reconstruction? Why should millions be spent daily on the war and yet there's not a penny available for medical services, artists, or for poor people?

Why do some people have to starve, while there are surpluses rotting in other parts of the world? Oh, why are people so crazy?

I don't believe that big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone, are guilty of the war. Oh no, the little man is just as guilty, otherwise the peoples of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! There's in people simply an urge to destroy, an urge to kill, to murder and rage, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged, everything that has been built up, cultivated, and grown will be destroyed and disfigured, after which mankind will have to begin all over again. "Anne Frank." "Anne Frank." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2007. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016

Aftermath

In 2013, Frank's diary was the subject of a censorship dispute in Michigan. The mother of a student at a state school filed a demanding complaint to have the definitive edition of the diary banned from Michigan schools. The definitive edition contains material that was deleted from the 1947 version of the diary. The mother claimed that the definitive edition contains pornographic descriptions of the human body. Free speech campaigners protested the mother's demands. According to the Guardian, a Michigan school committee rejected the complaint, ruling that banning the diary "would effectively impose situational censorship." The National Coalition Against Censorship supported the school district's decision and didn't ban the book. "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

Words for Him/Her

"Until I read Anne Frank's diary, I had found books a literal escape from what could be the harsh reality around me. After I read the diary, I had a fresh way of viewing the both literature and the world. From then on, I found I was impatient with books that were not honest or that were trivial and frivolous." -Alexandra Fuller

When I first read Anne Frank's 'Diary of a Young Girl,' I saw for the first time that a girl could be a writer and that it had something to do with survival and with ethics and fighting against evil. I admired her, though her diary remained terrifying and mysterious to me. She was a character in a real fairy tale - fairy tales are brutal." -Kate Bernheimer


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Legacy

"The memories, unremarkable as they may seem, are about a girl whose diary and death from typhus in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp at 15 have made her perhaps the Holocaust's foremost symbol of slaughtered innocence. People are fascinated or moved by the slimmest morsel of information about her. When watershed Holocaust dates come up on the calendar, like the anniversary of Kristallnacht, the pogrom in Germany and Austria on Nov. 9 and 10 in 1938, Anne's surviving relatives and friends are invited to share tidbits as well as tell their own often harrowing stories." Berger, Joseph. "An Icon, and Human Being." New York Times 5 Nov. 2014: A14(L). Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

Annotated Bibliograhy

"Aftermath" - "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.


"Diary" - "Anne(lies)Frank." People of the Holocaust. Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016.


"Choices and Results" - "Anne(lies Marie) Frank." Major Authors and Illustrators for Children and Young Adults. Detroit: Gale, 2002. Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.

"Early Life" - "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016.


"Forced into Hiding" - "Anne Frank." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016.


"In His/Her Words" - "Anne Frank." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2007. Biography in Context. Web. 5 May 2016


"Legacy" - Berger, Joseph. "An Icon, and Human Being." New York Times 5 Nov. 2014: A14(L). Biography in Context. Web. 6 May 2016.


"Words For Him/Her" -

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Anne Frank was an innocent Holocaust victim. Her diary had a huge impact on society and showed us how heartbreaking and terrible the event was.