The Cask of Amontialldo

By: Natalie Lewis, Billy Mangieri, and Lily Vogler

Literary Device Examples

Irony: "'I drink,' he said, 'to the buried that repose around us' 'And to your long life,'"


Symbolism: "'A huge human foot d'or, in a field azure; the foot crushes a serpent rampant whose fangs are imbedded in the heel.'"


Imagery: "Within the wall thus exposed by the displacing of the bones, we perceived a still interior recess, in depth above four feet, in width three, in height six or seven."


Tone: "...during which, that i might be hearken to it with the more satisfactory, I ceased my labors and sat down upon the bones."


Characterization: "You, who so well know the nature of my soul..."


Theme: "The thousand injuries of Fortunato i had borne as I best could; but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge."


Metaphor: "There come forth in return only a jingling of the bells"


Personification: The wine sparkled in his eyes and the bells jingled

Characterization of Characters

Direct and Indirect Characterizations


Direct: The author directly states a character's traits


Indirect: An author provides clues about a character by describing what the character looks like, acts like and says.


Montresor:

Direct

1.) "The thousand injuries of Fortunato i had borne as I best could; but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge."

2.) "I continued, as was my wont, to smile in his face, and he did not percieve that my smile now was at the thought of his immolation."


Indirect:

1.) "At length I would be avenged..."

2.)


Fortunato:

Direct

1.) "He prided himself in his connoisseurship in wine"

2.)

An Example and Explanation of Montresor's BETRAYAL

"Pass your hand," I said, "over the wall; you cannot help feeling the nitre. Indeed, it is very damp. Once more let me implore you to return. No? Then i must positively leave you. But I must render you all the little attentions in my power." "The Amontillado!" ejaculated my friend, not yet recovered from his astonishment. "True," I replied, "The Amontillado."


This text shows Montresor's betrayal near the end, when he tricks the drunken Fortunato in to walking into a room and getting chained up.