Postlethwait Press

November Issue

Nature by Izzy Carlton


Leaves will fall,

We'll have a ball

Fluff in pillows, and beauties like weeping willows

I will L A Y In the grass,

While I focus and ask;

"Why doesn't life last?"

Waves By: Mia Scala


I could tell by the looks on my cousins’ tan faces that

they thought I was a baby. In the wind my blonde hair

waved. I could taste the salty water. Fear struck me when

I saw my brother and cousins get tumbled by a wave.

When they emerged from the waves I managed to move

my feet from the motionless sand to the lively water.

I felt like a barrier was blocking me from where my

cousins had gone. My heart rate climbed in speed as I

heard the familiar voice of my cousin, Griffin,

“Mia get out here and quit crying!”

With an annoyed tone I replied, “I’m coming. Chill! ”

I got to where the waves break into tiny streams of water.

Feeling really proud, I grabbed the tube I had brought and

started to paddle through the deep blue ocean. The

waves were extremely small all day so I wasn't worried.

Then I realized that I could not feel the bottom. A wave of

fear rolled over me. I frantically looked for my cousins.

“Mia watch out!”

I heard a loud voice that split the

air like a dog whistle. Then everything went dark and I felt

a wave of fear strike. I heard the pounding sound of rushing

water blowing through my ears like the sound when

you’re driving quickly with the windows down. I felt the

sharp sand hit my face and the salty water burn my skin.

I felt small pebbles strike my arms. Then it hit me like

a giant boulder. I was trapped under the water.

I felt the cheap, rubbery, inner tube start deflating around

me. I had to get out of the tube before it completely

deflated but to do that I had to

get my ankle free . I yanked and tugged like my life

depended on it and finally the tube slipped from my

ankle.

I started to feel the rough, sandy bottom. I was

swimming forwards frantically, rubbing my shaking hands

on the bottom yet I was slowly losing hope and air. When

I thought my luck had run out I leaped from the bottom

and got a huge breath of relief. Next thing I knew I was

washed up on the shore. Rubbing the sand out of my eyes

I ran up the sandy beach once cloudy but now sun was

shining through clouds as if congratulating me for being

so brave. My 8 year old self ran up the beach sobbing. I

collapsed on a towel and explained my experience.

After this day in my life, I am way more aware that

this could happen again, but that doesn't keep me from

having fun! To this day I still get the jitters standing by

the water but you just have to go for it.

Evolution Of The Turkey By Lauren Skarosi

We all know about traditional, modern day Thanksgiving. We all know

about the first Thanksgiving. But what about everything that goes unnoticed?

What about different Thanksgivings across America? Well, that’s what’s going

to be explained here.

First, the first Thanksgiving, just to put everything into perspective.

Before Settlers came to America, Wampanoag (Native American) Tribes

homed the East Coast lands. Around the fall of each year, they would

celebrate the plentiful fall harvests and anything else that was of importance

to the tribe, such as the birth of a child. Similar to the Wampanoag Tribes, the

people of England celebrated similar for the plentiful harvest, which started to

make up Thanksgiving a long time ago, before they ever knew it. After the

Settlers came over and ‘discovered’ America, the Wampanoag Tribes and the

Settlers all met and made peace, after a while. The classic Thanksgiving

menu contained turkey, cranberries, pumpkin pie, and root vegetables. The

menu was based on New England fall harvests that were brought over to

America.

As the Thanksgiving holiday spreads across the country throughout the

decades, local cooks modified the menu to consist of ‘what we like to eat’

instead of ‘this is what we have to eat’, which makes Thanksgiving an even

more significant holiday for everyone across the country.

As Thanksgiving has knowingly spread to all corners of America,

different places have changed up recipes and spices for their specific

preferences. For instance, in the South West area, mostly near New Mexico,

they’ve add different chile spices onto the turkey and into the stuffing. As for

around the Chesapeake Bay, where crabs are popular and there are a lot of

them, crabs are a traditional food for many families near the Chesapeake Bay

to have as appetizers. As for the Midwest, they will usually have some sort of

corn or beans in their meal, since there are corn and bean fields in their area,

which makes it easily accessible for them.

What about you? Does your family do some of these things? Or do they do something completely different?

November Facts

* Did you know that on November 14th Children's Day is celebrated?

* November 15th is the 319th day of the year (only 6 weeks left until the end of the year!)

* November’s gemstone is a Topaz.

* The 2 Zodiac signs for November are The Scorpio and Sagittarius.

* November 19 ,1863 is the 155th anniversary of when Abraham Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address.

* The name November comes from the Latin novem which means 9 (it was the 9th month until January and February were added to the calendar.) By: Mya Poe and Cierra Gray

Postlethwait Middle School

November News Article for November

Did you know that 114,370 people in Delaware struggle with hunger and 34, 240 are kids? Did you also know that we, as kids, being a part of the community, could donate food to help

these people? Our school is working with the food bank to help provide food to these families for Thanksgiving. There are brown barrels set up around the school for Postlethwait students as well as the community to place canned goods and non-perishable items. The goal is to reach 1,000 pounds of food and to feed as many families as we can throughout our community. Dr. Failing, our principal, used to work at Charlton, and they had a backpack program. Dr.Failing feels “it’s very important to have food on the table”. The backpack program for the kids provided food to take home for the weekend. This was important because, at times, it was the only source of food they had before returning to school the following week.

Please help us reach our goal and put food on the table for these families by Thanksgiving.

Please provide your donation by November 16th.

Written by Olivia Lewandowski