Babylonia

The Capital of Scholarship and Science 1894B.C.E.-539B.C.E.

The Venus Tablet

The tablet was created around the time 1000 B.C.E. most of the surviving tablets are copies made during the reign of the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal. This tablet contained a record of the appearances and disappearances of Venus during Ammi-saduqas reign as Babylonian king.

The Babylonian Contributions

The Babylonians were the first civilization to possess a accurate theory of all the planets. They were also the first to apply mathematics to all their predictions and they were converted into tablets to be remembered till this day to allow us to recognize that they had the resources back then to do miraculous things. They had a planetary theory was comprised of a list of omens that described their relationship with the motion of planets. So as you can see the Babylonians contributed the theory of planets that we built on over time and we have the knowledge today because they started at that time.

Mesopotamian Time

The Babylonians are known in Astronomy for their concept of a calendar that contains the year, month, week, and day! While they were not the first ones to create a calendar, they were the first ones to think of these concepts that are now used in our system world wide today.

Sorces!

Knight, Judson. "The Calendar Takes Shape in Mesopotamia." Science and Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol. 1: 2,000 B.C. to A.D. 699. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 356-358. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 3 Sept. 2015.

URL

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3408500377&v=2.1&u=j070911001&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=cc86ac9bf2b31e5b5ea92282335a9192


"Astronomy." World Eras. Ed. Ronald Wallenfels. Vol. 8: Ancient Mesopotamia, 3300-331 B.C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2005. 329-338. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 3 Sept. 2015.

URL

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3035300163&v=2.1&u=j070911001&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=99c717e33193c7e9b4174695026beb9e


Lerner, K. Lee. "Astrology and Astronomy in the Ancient World." Science and Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol. 1: 2,000 B.C. to A.D. 699. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 248-250. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 3 Sept. 2015.

URL

http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3408500271&v=2.1&u=j070911001&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w&asid=6328b70c15697cd31d397b066501c6a5