Civil Rights Movement

by Alejandra Guerrero

The Civil Rights Movement Contribution to Today

The Civil Rights Movement has changed people's thoughts and opinions on racism. Our society today isn't segregated anymore as it was during the Civil Rights time period. Most people are no longer racist and accept individuals of all races. Society has come to realize that we are all human, despite the color of our skin.

Civil Rights Methods

Many of the people who were against segregation participated in sit-ins. These sit-ins usually occurred inside of restaurants. Colored people would sit at counters that were meant to be for white people. White people were frustrated by this, but the sit-ins continued. Public facilities such as restaurants and movie theaters were eventually desegregated.
in 1955, colored people united and started what is known as the Montgomery Bus Boycott. They stopped riding public buses after Rosa Parks was arrested for sitting in the front of a bus and refusing to give up her seat to a white person. Colored people found ways of getting around town during the boycott. They car-pooled and would even walk miles to get to their desired destinations. The boycott decreased the business of bus companies, since colored people made up the majority of bus riders. In 1956, Montgomery's bus system was integrated, ending the boycott and bringing joy to colored people.
Marches were used to protest equality. In 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference marched from Selma to Montgomery. They marched for the registration of colored voters in the South. Along the way, they were met with violence from haters but were under the protection of National Guard troops. After three days of marching, they achieved their goal and arrived at Montgomery. The march helped to raise awareness of colored people's difficulty to vote. Later that year, the Voting Rights Act was passed.

Unsung Heroes - Civil Rights Martyrs

Jimmie Lee Jackson was a colored civil rights activist. Jackson was participating in a non-violent protest in February 1965 when a tragic event occurred. He was attempting to protect his family when he got shot by a state trooper. He died in the hospital a week later from his infected wound at the age of 26. His wrongful death led to the march from Selma to Montgomery. The Voting Rights Act was passed later in 1965 after the march.
Not all of the Civil Rights Martyrs were colored. William Lewis Moore was a white civil rights activist. Moore was participating in a one-man march in the early 1960's to deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi. He got shot on his way there in Chattanooga, Tennessee. His body was later found with two gunshot wounds. The murderer of Moore was unknown. Inspired by his sacrifice, many people decided to finish his walk. They even risked getting imprisoned in order to honor his memory.

"Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me 'Round" by The Roots

Ain't gonna let nobody turn me 'round,

Turn me 'round, turn me 'round.

Ain't gonna let nobody, turn me 'round.

I'm gonna keep on a-walkin', keep on a-talkin',

Marchin' on to freedom land


Ain't gonna let no jailhouse turn me 'round,

Turn me 'round, turn me 'round.

Ain't gonna let no jailhouse, turn me 'round.

I'm gonna keep on a-walkin', keep on a-talkin',

Marchin' on to freedom land


Ain't let segregation turn me 'round,

Turn me 'round, turn me 'round.

Ain't gonna let segregation turn me 'round,

I'm gonna keep on a-walkin', keep on a-talkin'.

Marchin' on to freedom land


Keep on a-walkin', keep on a-talkin',

Marchin' on to freedom land

"Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me 'Round" is a song performed by The Roots. This song is based on the marches from the Civil Rights Movement. It's about how colored people would not let anybody stop them from marching until they had gained their freedom. It expresses the determination that colored people had. They did not let things such as jail or segregation stop them from achieving their ultimate goal, which was desegregation.