Robert Oppenheimer

Theoretical Physicist

Early Life


"On April 22, 1904, J. Robert Oppenheimer, whose father was a German immigrant and wealthy textile importer, was born in New York City."-

"J. Robert Oppenheimer." Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016.

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He attended the ethical culture school before Harvard where he earned his bachelors degree. He then went to Cambridge university and Gottingen university where he received his doctorate.

Getting Involved

He started impacting the community by teaching at the California university of Technology and the university of California at Berkeley. He was such a great teacher and leader that many students followed him in the switch between the two colleges. So oppenhiemer became a prime factor for the development of theoretical physics. Later he developed the modern quantum theory for the understanding of molecules and their spectra. But his biggest contribution to society was his part in the project to build the atomic bomb.

Choices and Results

Through out his life he made many great contributions to society among these being:

Teaching at many colleges educating a whole generation of theoretical physysists. But his greatest achievement was his work in the development and creation of the atomic bomb.

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In His Words

"When you see something that is technically sweet, you go ahead and do it and you argue about what to do about it only after you have had your technical success. That is the way it was with the atomic bomb. -J. Robert Oppenheimer"
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/jrobertop159316.html

This shows that he did it for the science and didn't think about what could ensue in the aftermath.

I am become death, the destroyer of worlds.
http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/jrobertop101189.html

This shows how he felt after he realized the implications of what he had done by creating the bomb.

Words for Him

"completely loyal.","the typical American schoolboy attitude that there is something wicked about telling on a friend."-General Groves's to the Chevalier incident. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016.


"no board should ever [decide] whether a man should serve his country or not because he expressed strong opinions. If you want to try that case, you can try me. I have expressed strong opinions many times, and I intend to do so .... When a man is pilloried for doing that, this country is in a severe state."-Vannevar Bush"Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016.



"the fact that associations in 1940 are regarded with the same seriousness that similar associations would be regarded today is a manifestation of hysteria."-John Lansdale's response to the chevalier incident "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016.


"There is a real, positive record ... we have an A-bomb ... what more do you want, mermaids?"-Isador I. Rabi

Legacy

Soon after the war he was asked by the the government to help them create bigger and better bombs to fight the soviets in the cold war. He refused saying it wasn't moraly feasable. They then they then tried to make him resign with the charges of being a soviet spy even though according to "Oppenheimer Under Suspicion".
"Oppenheimer's political background had been well known to the government ever since he first joined government service, and he had been fully investigated twice--when named director of Los Alamos in 1942 and during a subsequent AEC investigation in 1947--and cleared both times." Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. Oppenheimer demanded a hearing. But, when the hearing happened according to "Oppenheimer" under suspicion
"Oppenheimer's true ordeal began on the third day, when the chief AEC counsel, Roger Robb, began his cross-examination An assistant United States attorney who had litigated 23 murder cases, Robb was a wily and experienced courtroom gladiator who relished the battle. And he had another decided advantage: because the AEC had granted him an emergency "Q" security clearance, Robb enjoyed access to the vast store of classified documents, reports, and other material compiled on Oppenheimer during years of surveillance. Although Garrison had also applied for clearance more than two weeks before the hearing, the AEC turned him down, saying it hadn't enough time to conduct the requisite investigation. Yet Robb had been investigated and cleared in only eight days. Without clearance, Garrison would not only be unable to examine vital evidence, but would actually have to leave the hearing room whenever classified material was under discussion--leaving his client unrepresented."
So not only was his accused under insufficient evidence he was deprived of his 6th amendment right to a lawyer. So in the end Oppenheimer was fired and his security clearance revoked. He wasn't even allowed to read documents he wrote! But, eventually in an effort to help pardon Oppenheimer president John F. Kennedy awarded him with the Fermi award. He worked as a professor at Princeton untill he died there on February 18, of 1967.

Bibleography

1.Encyclopedia of World Biography. Detroit: Gale, 1998. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016. I liked this quote because not much is known about his childhood because he became famous later.


2."J. Robert Oppenheimer." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I chose this photo because it conveys his emotions well.


3. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/jrobertop159316.html I like this quote because it shows he didn't think about what would happen when he created the bomb untill after.


4. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/j/jrobertop101189.html I chose this quote because it shows how he felt after the successful test of the bomb.


5. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I chose this quote because it shows some evidence for oppenheimers innocence.


6. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I liked this quote because it shows that someone having an opinion is hardly proof of disloyalty.


7. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I liked this quote because it show that an incident years ago shouldn't suddenly be incriminating.


8. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I like this quote because it shows that one incident doesn't trump a lifetime of good.


9. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I liked this quote because it shows that there was no reason to question his loyalty in the first place.


10. Wolverton, Mark. "Oppenheimer under suspicion." American History 37.3 (2002): 36+. Biography in Context. Web. 9 May 2016. I chose this quote because it shows that not only did they withhold information critical to the case they deprived Oppenheimer of his 6th amendment right to a lawyer violating his constitutional rights.