Samurai

The Samurai Warriors of Feudal Japan

U.S Military Branches Were Influenced By Samurai Warriors

The United States branches of military use the Samurai warrior training tactics to train soldiers at boot camps every day. They use a code of honor much like the Bushido Code that the Samurai used in the early days in Feudal Japan. They teach our soldiers to honor the country, their fellow brothers and the missions that they have to train for by following a strict code. Soldiers are taught important discipline procedures that help them to support each other while in combat and to never leave a fallen soldier behind. These principles first came from the the Samurai warriors because they valued honor before death. If death were necessary; it was always done in an honorable way.
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The Bushido Code

The Bushido Code was based on seven principles that all Samurai warriors learned in their training in Feudal Japan. The young boys learned that it was important to be respectful to others and to be committed to their Shogun or emperor in charge. The warriors' commitment was a lifelong ideal that played out in his attitude and how he carried himself. He was expected to be the best at his discipline, in fighting, and in needed meditation every day.
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The Ultimate Warrior

To die a good death with one's honor intact, the ultimate aim in a life lived according to bushidō. Indeed, a "good death" is its own reward, and by no means assurance of "future rewards" in the afterlife. The Samurai warrior was a man of great skill, power, and offered himself if needed as a sacrifice for the Shogun of Feudal Japan. The U.S. military has gained great knowledge and core principles from the influence of the early Samurai warriors.