The Midwest

Our Nation's Breadbasket

A Culture of Agriculture

The states of the Midwest are widely known as the nation's breadbasket. The states of Kansas, Ohio, Missouri, Minnesota, Michigan, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa. These states are relatively flat with fertile soil. Lots of a mineral rich organic material known as humus is found in here in the soil. Midwestern farms are among the most productive in the world. The high wheat output among others such as corn, soybeans, and hogs also contribute to the nickname of the region and keeping an average American well fed. The growing seasons throughout the region vary greatly. A growing season is the average # of days between the last frost of spring to the first frost of fall. From a 200 day one in Kansas to a less than 120 day one near the Canadian border. The Chicago Mercantile Exchange is the world's busiest market for all things farm product. This board of trade is the largest grain exchange, a place where buyers and sellers deal gran. The people here take their farming seriously...agriculture is basically their culture.

Farming & a Resourceful Industry

A big big part of the Midwest, obviously by now, is farming. Farming is everywhere in this region of the United States though, its not just cows and plows. There is new modern day equipment for the farming and such. New irrigation systems, tractors, pesticides, and and important one grain elevators. They are these massive buildings used for the treating and transporting and storing of, you guessed it, grain. The region's climate really supports the agriculture because of the stable temperatures and average yearly precipitation. Most of the Midwest's major cities are all located along the Great Lakes or along major rivers. Water transportation has vastly helped heavy industries, like farming, in this region grow. Other industries based on the region's natural resources are mostly manufacturing. Minnesota has its iron ore production. Indiana and Illinois have their coal deposits. Steel mills in Indiana and Ohio. In Michigan, you have the automobile industry. Resources are literally of no shortage in the Midwestern economy. The Midwest is basically a place where urban areas meet rural ones in some kind of paradoxal paradise.

Michigan

Michigan is known by its nickname for its shape, The Mitten State. Michigan is the tenth most populous state in the United States and is a state in the Midwest. Lansing is the capital with the biggest city being Detroit. Being surrounded by 4/5 of the Great Lakes, Michigan has the world's longest freshwater coastline. When you think if Michigan your mind may jump to it being freezing cold in the winter and also you'll think of Detroit. The state isn't just cold with a city notorious for being an awful place. The state of Michigan is actually a peninsula, the upper being a tourist destination and abundant in resources making it important to the states diverse economy...whith the lower being the hub for manufacturing, services, and high-tech industry. What Michigan is known best for...is the economy on automobiles in its lower peninsula (the Motor City of Detroit). The main thing to know about Michigan is that three of the main automotive companies in the world are housed in Detroit. Most, besides the Red Wings NHL team, Michigan is really known for being car heavy in industry.

Missouri

Missouri, the Gateway State, with the St. Louis Archway sitting over the Mississppi River. The state's capital Is Jefferson City. The land that is now Missouri was acquired from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase. It was admitted into the union as the 24th state on August 10, 1821. Missouri's geography is highly varied. The northern part of the state is till plains and the south has the Ozark Mountains with the Missouri River dividing the regions. The state lies at the intersection of the three greatest rivers of US, with the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers near St. Louis, and the Ohio River with the Mississippi north of the state's acclaimed bootheel shape. the four largest urban areas are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, and Columbia.