Culturally Responsive Educators

EQUITY: Advancing as Culturally Responsive Educators

Michelle Nutter, E&O Civil Rights Outreach Specialist, Office of Public Engagement and PA Office of Attorney General

Professional Learning will focus on three key areas:


Beyond Bullying


As schools work to successfully prevent and intervene in acts of bullying, they are often challenged by bullying behaviors that cross the line into civil, civil rights or criminal law violations. Guidance from The United States Department of Education and United States Department of Justice will be viewed and discussed. Participants will examine federal statutes that prohibit bullying and harassment based on protected classes, such as race, color, national origin, gender and disability. Participants will also receive information relative to possible criminal law implications when bullying behaviors cause mental or physical injury to targeted students. Finally, this session will examine the legal ramifications of "deliberate indifference" with regard to failure to address bullying in their schools.


Advancing as Culturally Responsive Educators


Culture plays a role in everything we do – it is an essential part of how we learn. It plays a role not only in communicating and receiving information, but also in shaping the thinking process of groups and individuals. Culturally responsive teaching that acknowledges, responds to, and celebrates fundamental cultures offers full, equitable access to education for students from all cultures. As culturally responsive educators, we recognize the importance of including students’ cultural identities in all aspects of learning, thereby enriching classroom experiences and keeping students engaged. This training will provide participants with opportunities to examine culture – their own culture and the cultures of the students they serve.


How to Speak Up at School


Have you ever found yourself in the uncomfortable circumstance where someone, a student, parent or colleague, uses biased language or stereotypes in school? This workshop, based on Teaching Tolerance’s publication, How to Speak Up at School, is designed for educators who want to develop the skills to speak up themselves and who want to help their students find the courage to speak up, too. When someone makes a biased statement, we must act quickly! Using video scenarios, participants will learn to use four techniques (interrupt, question, educate and echo) to respond to biased language in the moment, from any source, in any situation.

LOGISTICS

Tuesday, Nov. 19th, 9am-3pm

4500 6th Avenue

Altoona, PA

LOCATION: IU 8 Executive Office, Altoona

Lunch on your own

NO COST: Federally funded

ACT 48 Approved

QUESTIONS?

Contact:

Jennifer L. Anderson

IU 8 Director of Professional Learning and Organizational Development

Regional Coordinator of Safe Schools, School Climate, and Equity