Health & Nutrition

Victoria Reyer

http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/101/food-safety/is-organic-better.aspx

Organic foods are better than non-organic foods because not only do they taste better, but they have been proven to contain more antioxidants, and are more eco-friendly than non-organic foods. According to recent studies, pregnant women and children are more susceptible to complications from consuming pesticides and meat containing growth hormones. Organic foods are produced using natural fertilizers like compost or manure, and do not contain harmful pesticides. To avoid using pesticides, organic farmers use constant crop rotations to ward off insects.

To check that a product is ‘truly’ organic before purchasing it, look for a USDA seal on the label. This seal means that the product was examined by the United States Department of Agriculture and it meets their standards. However, many people complain that products displaying this sticker are significantly more expensive than their non-organic counterparts. A way to cut cost and still be able to buy organic foods is to buy organics in bulk and freeze the extra until you need it. Another alternative is to buy generic brands of organics, instead of the products with more expensive name-brand labels.

If you take everything into consideration, organic foods are a better option than non-organics. They’re produced more sustainably, more humanely, they taste better, contain more antioxidants, and are safer to feed your children.

http://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/101/nutrition-basics/food-pyramid.aspx

This article basically explains how you’re supposed to measure your food portions, and how you’re supposed to select which foods to eat based off of the food pyramid. A good rule of thumb to follow when choosing what to eat is to eat a lot of fruits and vegetables of varying colors. For example, a good meal for lunch would be grilled chicken with a side of roasted organic broccoli, brown rice, and a cup of organic grapes. Rice, which is a grain, is a part of the most significant and largest food group on the food pyramid. The average person should consume 6 servings of whole grains daily.

The vegetable food group is a close second; the average person should consume five servings of vegetables daily. Fruit is next, with four daily servings, followed by milk, which is three cups. Milk products are better for you if you eat and drink the low-fat or non-fat options-- like buying fat free milk instead of whole. Then there’s meat and beans, which the average person should consume two to three servings of daily. The average person should consume six tablespoons or less of oils per day, which makes up the tip of the pyramid, and the smallest food group. Recently, there was another food group added, which people refer to as “discretionary calories,” which are basically extra calories that aren’t included in the food pyramid that you can use on foods that are high in fat or sugar, like desserts.

http://www.handletheheat.com/skinny-chocolate-chip-cookies/

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup room temperature organic virgin coconut oil
1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg
1 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup chocolate chips

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt.

In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat the coconut oil, applesauce, brown sugar, and granulated sugar until well combined. Beat in the egg and vanilla. On low speed, gradually beat in the flour mixture. Stir in the chocolate chips.

Drop by rounded tablespoons onto the prepared baking sheets. Bake for 10 minutes, or until light brown. Let cool on wire racks.

http://keepinitkind.com/easy-homemade-vegan-yeast-free-flatbread/

Ingredients

  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour + more if necessary and for your floured surface
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup non-dairy milk (I used almond)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  1. Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl. Use a spoon to stir until a dough forms and then use your hands to knead until it is soft and pliable. The ball of dough should be soft, pliable, but not sticky. If it is sticky, add flour by the tablespoon until it no longer sticks to your finger when touched.
  2. Transfer the ball of dough to a floured surface. Divide the dough in half and roll both halves into balls. Divide each of those balls in half and roll them into balls. Divide the four balls in half, creating 8 small balls of dough. Set them aside.
  3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Make sure your surface is still well-floured. Take one ball and use your fingers to flatten it into a circle. Use a rolling pin to roll the dough out into a 5 to 6-inch circle-ish shape. Place the flattened dough on the prepared baking sheet and repeat with 3 more balls of dough (it's okay if the flattened circles slightly overlap each other). Lay another sheet of parchment paper over the circles and continue with the remaining 4 balls of dough (laying them on the top sheet of paper).
  4. Heat a frying pan or griddle over medium-high heat. Place one of the circles of dough in the pan and cook until bubbles begin to form and the edges begin to lift, about 1 to 2 minutes. Use tongs to quickly flip it over and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the pan and place on a plate. Cover with a clean kitchen towel to keep warm. Repeat with the remaining circles of dough.
  5. If they are not eaten immediately, let them cool before transferring them to an airtight container. Refrigerate for 3 to 4 days. Enjoy!
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http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Low-Fat-Blueberry-Bran-Muffins/Detail.aspx?evt19=1&referringHubId=84

Ingredients (makes 12 muffins)


Makes servings USMetricAdjust Recipe (Help)


  • 1 1/2 cups wheat bran

  • 1 cupnonfat milk

  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce

  • 1 egg

  • 2/3 cup brown sugar

  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

  • 1/2 cup whole wheat flour

  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions


  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Grease muffin cups or use paper muffin liners. Mix together wheat bran and milk, and let stand for 10 minutes.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together applesauce, egg, brown sugar, and vanilla. Beat in bran mixture. Sift together all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Stir into bran mixture until just blended. Fold in blueberries. Scoop into muffin cups.
  3. Bake in preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes, or until tops spring back when lightly tapped.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Banana-Waffles/Detail.aspx?evt19=1&referringHubId=15334

Ingredients


  • 1 1/4 cusall-purpose flour

  • 3 teaspoons baking powder

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1 pinch ground nutmeg

  • 1 cup 1% milk

  • 1 egg

  • 2 ripe bananas, sliced


  • Directions

  1. Preheat waffle iron. In a large mixing bowl, sift together flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg. Stir in milk and eggs until mixture is smooth.
  2. Spray preheated waffle iron with non-stick cooking spray. Pour two tablespoons of the waffle batter onto the hot waffle iron. Place two slices of banana on top of the batter and then spoon another two tablespoons of batter on top of the banana. Cook until golden brown. Serve hot.

Workout 1

1 minute standing hamstring stretch

1 minute standing quad stretch

1 minute plank walks

1 minute back pedal

1 minute straight leg kicks

1 minute side lunge with rotation

1 minute plank row to rotation

1 minute burpees

1 minute alternating cross over lunges with bicep curl

1 minute 2 feet lateral box jumps

1 minute side lunge with rotation

1 minute plank row rotation

1 minute burpees

1 minute alternating cross over lunges with bicep curl

1 minute 2 feet lateral box jumps

1 minute alternating transverse lunge with press

1 minute squat arm curls

1 minute sumo squat with lateral raise

1 minute single leg deadlift dumbbell row

1 minute broad jumps

30 seconds rest

1 minute alternating transverse lunge with press

1 minute squat arm curls

1 minute sumo squat with lateral raise

1 minute single leg deadlift dumbbell row

1 minute broad jumps

30 seconds rest

1 minute modified plank

1 minute russian twists

1 minute toe touches

1 minute side plank with hip dips

1 minute roll ups

1 minute modified plank

1 minute russian twists

1 minute toe touches

1 minute roll ups

1 minute pigeon stretch

1 minute pretzel stretch

1 minute lying quad stretch

1 minute lower back stretch

Workout 2

1 minute light jog

1 minute walk outs

1 minute walking lunges

1 minute jump rope

1 minute box ski jumps

30 second mountain climbers (modified)

30 second pushup hold rows

1 minute alternating step back lunges

30 seconds pushups with feet on medicine ball

1 minute side v-ups with leg kicks

1 minute sumo squat hold with shoulder press

1 minute russian twists

30 second rest

1 minute alternating step back lunges

30 seconds push ups with feet on medicine ball

30 seconds toe touches

30 second plank

1 minute russian twists

30 seconds mountain climbers

30 seconds rest

1 minute ski jumps

30 seconds modified mountain climbers

30 seconds push up hold rows

1 minute alternating step back lunge row

1 minute standing hamstring stretch

1 minute lower back stretch

1 minute lying quad stretch

2 minutes child’s pose

Workout 3

1 minute straight leg kicks

1 minute high knees

1 minute light jog

1 minute walking lunges

30 seconds ski jumps

30 seconds mountain climbers

1 minute kettlebell swings

30 seconds split jumps

40 seconds rest

30 seconds frog jumps

30 seconds high knees in place

30 seconds squat jumps

1 minute modified pushups

30 seconds 2 feet lateral hops in place

30 seconds 2 feet forward/ back hops in place

2 minutes alternating forward lunge with arm curl

1 minute rest

30 seconds broad jumps

30 seconds 2 feet lateral hops (distance)

2 minutes side lunges

1 minute bicycles

40 seconds rest

1 minute toe touches

30 seconds knee tucks

1 minute side plank

1 minute russian twists

2 minutes pretzel stretch

2 minute lying quad stretch

1 minute lower back stretch

Workout 4

1 minute walking lunges

1 minute side lunges

1 minute high knees

1 minute standing hamstring stretch

1 minute modified push ups

30 seconds squat jumps

30 seconds mountain climbers

1 minute squats

30 seconds frog jumps

30 seconds rest

1 minute modified pushups

30 seconds squat jumps

30 seconds mountain climbers

1 minute squats

30 seconds frog jumps

1 minute modified plank

30 seconds recover

1 minute walking lunges

30 seconds modified burpees

30 seconds mountain climbers

1 minute ski jump back lunges

20 seconds recover

1 minute walking lunges

30 seconds modified burpees

30 seconds mountain climbers

1 minute ski jump to cross back lunge

30 seconds knee tucks

1 minute russian twists

30 seconds rest

1 minute opposite arm/ leg extension

1 minute broad jumps

30 seconds high knees in place

1 minute tricep dips

30 seconds jump rope

30 second plank walks

30 seconds recover

1 minute opposite arm/ leg extension

30 seconds scissor jumps

1 minute broad jumps

30 seconds high knee runs in place

1 minute tricep dips

30 seconds plank walk

30 seconds rest

30 seconds 2 feet lateral hops in place

1 minute crunches

30 seconds rest

1 minute standing quad stretch

1 minute lying quad stretch

1 minute standing hamstring stretch

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/in-depth/exercise/art-20048389

Exercise can help prevent excess weight gain or help maintain weight loss. When you engage in physical activity, you burn calories. The more intense the activity, the more calories you burn. You don't need to set aside large chunks of time for exercise to reap weight-loss benefits. If you can't do an actual workout, get more active throughout the day in simple ways — by taking the stairs instead of the elevator or revving up your household chores. Regular physical activity can help you prevent or manage a wide range of health problems and concerns, including stroke, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, depression, certain types of cancer, arthritis and falls. Physical activity stimulates various brain chemicals that may leave you feeling happier and more relaxed. You may also feel better about your appearance and yourself when you exercise regularly, which can boost your confidence and improve your self-esteem. Exercise and physical activity deliver oxygen and nutrients to your tissues and help your cardiovascular system work more efficiently. And when your heart and lungs work more efficiently, you have more energy to go about your daily chores. Regular physical activity can help you fall asleep faster and deepen your sleep. Just don't exercise too close to bedtime, or you may be too energized to fall asleep. Exercise and physical activity can be a fun way to spend some time. It gives you a chance to unwind, enjoy the outdoors or simply engage in activities that make you happy. Physical activity can also help you connect with family or friends in a fun social setting. Exercise and physical activity are a great way to feel better, gain health benefits and have fun. As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity every day. If you want to lose weight or meet specific fitness goals, you may need to exercise more. Remember to check with your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you haven't exercised for a long time, have chronic health problems, such as heart disease, diabetes or arthritis, or you have any concerns.

http://www.eatingwell.com/nutrition_health/nutrition_news_information/the_health_benefits_and_cons_of_coffee?page=2

Over 18,000 studies have looked at coffee use in the past few decades. Lately more and more are reporting real health benefits for coffee drinkers—but they must be balanced against the brew's possible bitter effects, especially in higher, caffeinated doses. An ideal "dose" of java is hard to determine, since people’s perceptions of "a cup of coffee" vary as widely as coffee-mug sizes do. But the good news is that many of the benefits are associated with around two to four (8-ounce) cups a day—"and that’s what most Americans drink anyway," notes Joe Vinson, Ph.D., a coffee expert at the University of Scranton, Pennsylvania. Moderate coffee drinking—between 1 and 5 cups daily—may help reduce risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as Parkinson’s disease, studies suggest. How? Coffee’s antioxidants may prevent some damage to brain cells and boost the effects of neurotransmitters involved in cognitive function, say experts. ­Preliminary studies have noted that as coffee (or tea) intake rises, ­incidence of glioma, a form of brain cancer, tends to drop. Some ­researchers speculate that compounds in the brews could activate a DNA-repairing protein in cells—possibly preventing the DNA damage that can lead to cells becoming cancerous. Studies link frequent coffee consumption (4 cups per day or more) with a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Scientists suspect that antioxidant compounds in coffee—cholorogenic acid and quinides—may boost cells’ sensitivity to insulin, which helps regulate blood sugar. While most of the research didn’t assess whether the brews were caffeinated, decaf may be even better, since other studies have found that caffeine tends to blunt the insulin-sensitivity boost.
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