Because you lift us UP

Happy 2019 Staff Appreciation

The 7UPs of teaching...

Great staff help children to:

RISE UP to meet their challenges,

SOAK UP so much knowledge,

SHAPE UP their behavior and character,

LIVE UP to their potential,

STEP UP to difficult tasks,

GROW UP to be responsible citizens,

BUILD UP their self esteems.


Thank you for lifting our students UP! This week, we look forward to LIFTING YOU ALL UP!

Monday: Carb UP, Drink UP

Carb UP with BJs Pizza and Salad,

Drink UP with a Soda of your choice.

Tuesday: Wake UP, Drink UP

PTA says...

Wake UP with yogurt, coffee, juice and soda bar.

Admin says...

Sugar Up with "Up" themed cupcakes.

Big picture

Wednesday: Fork UP, Drink UP

PTA says...

Fork UP with a pasta lunch and Drink UP with your favorite soda.

Thursday: Dress UP, Snack UP

Dress UP with a new THE shirt,

Snack UP with some delicious candy bars in the lounge.

Friday: Eat UP, Drink UP, & Feet UP

Eat UP and Drink UP with breakfast tacos and drinks, compliments of Randolph Brooks Federal Credit Union and Taco Cabana.


Feet UP- Let's end the week celebrating all of your hard work with a movie.

"Up" will be starting at 1:30pm- until end of the day. Popcorn delivery for all students and staff.

*The school will run an early release schedule to support instruction being completed prior to 1:30pm. The TEK Connection, Social Emotional Learning, will be met using the Up Movie Rated PG for all K-5 students. Teaching with a Movie Resource: http://teachwithmovies.org/up/

*Movie Permission Slip Attached Below

Social Emotional Learning Movie Options for May 10, 2019

Staff- If you feel UP isn't the best choice this week for an SEL lesson (starts a little sad), we have made a list of a few other movies that your class can choose from. Up will be "streamed" schoolwide, so if you are selecting a different movie from below, please ensure you have parent permission and work through how your sutdents will view the selected movie. I wanted you all to have some different options just in case this wasn't something you were feeling this week!


If it is a G movie, you do not have to get permission from parents. PG movies require parent permission. I have attached a generic permission slip that will be used for the Up Movie or any selected movie.


EMPATHY HABIT 1 – Emotional Literacy: Recognizing, understanding, & communicating feelings

The right films can be a fun way to help kids recognize emotions. Pick ones that depict different emotions and then identify characters’ feelings and how the child feels as the viewer. Also, turn off the television sound for a few minutes and have kids try guessing together how the actors feel based on their body language or facial expressions. Nail biting can mean “She’s tense!” A clenched jaw could signify “He’s scared!” Nodding and leaning in mean “She’s interested!” Other movies in this resource for emotions: Shrek, Dumbo, Despicable Me, Finding Nemo, Frozen, Harry Potter. And then there’s also Bambi as a real tear-jerker. Name the emotions!


Inside Out (Pixar, 2015). The best giving important messages about needing to feel-and express-all of your emotions, whether happy or sad, told from perspective of an 11-year-old. P, S- Rated PG


Minions (2015) and Despicable Me (2010). Lighthearted, at time hilarious, the characters are in tune with each other even though they don’t speak a real language. P, S Rated PG


EMPATHY HABIT 2 – Moral Identity: Adopting & exercising an ethical code

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971). Trust, honesty, gratitude, moral identity: a grateful child repeatedly chooses to do the right thing! Rated G


EMPATHY HABIT 3 – Perspective Taking: Understanding others’ needs & walking in their shoes Here are films to discuss role taking and understand other people’s perspectives with kids.

Dumbo (1941). This is a classic story of a lonely little elephant with over-sized ears who is unmercifully picked on. P Rated G


EMPATHY HABIT 7 – Collaboration: Teamwork to learn to think “Us,” not “Them”

A Bug’s Life (1998). A misfit ant, looking for “warriors” to save his colony for greedy grasshoppers, recruits a group of bugs that turn out to be an inept circus troupe. P, S Rated G


Beauty and the Beast (2017). A beautiful Belle offers herself to the ugly Beast in order to save her poor father’s life and discovers his wonderful kind heart. S, T Rated PG


EMPATHY HABIT 9 – Altruistic Change Making: Wanting to make a positive difference

Finding Nemo (2003). Nemo is separated from his father. The scene in which the fish in the tank decide to help Nemo (sacrificing their freedom) is a powerful display of altruism. And Nemo returns to set them free. P, S Rated G


Another option not listed under Empathy Habits for our older kiddos:

Star Wars: Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back RATED PG

Elementary and up (some intense scenes)
Both parents and kids are sure to enjoy this action-packed classic while also learning about self-control skills. Watch Luke Skywalker harness the Force, practice self-control, and learn discipline as he trains to become a Jedi knight under the guidance of Yoda.

Online resources the above movies were found on.

Learning Works for Kids (Online Resource) writes...

Social emotional learning (SEL) skills help young children to manage emotions, cooperate with others, understand themselves, and deal with stress. SEL skills are crucial for twenty-first century kids who are involved in project-based learning and need to collaborate and communicate more effectively than they did in the past. Many of the jobs of the future will require SEL skills in order to create solutions for issues such as poverty, pollution, and prosperity. Schools have long ignored SEL skills but have begun to recognize that they may actually be more important than academic skills and that improving social emotional learning skills can often lead directly to improvement in test scores.

Kids typically learn about these skills from their interactions with the world and may model behavior observed in their peers or parents. When others that they respect show these skills, kids are more likely to internalize them and use them on their own. Most kids pick up many SEL skills on their own, but instruction at school, via books, and in specific training can be very helpful.

Kids might also learn SEL skills through the media that they consume. While I have some concerns about some of their favorite media – watch a slime video with any preteen kid, and you’ll know what I mean – there are many great sources of models for excellent SEL skills in movies. Some of these movies may show both ineffective and effective SEL strategies, but they all ultimately get to a helpful conclusion.

May 6, 2019

Parents,

At the end of this week, we would like to have some quality time with the students while watching a movie connected to Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Skills. The movie we have selected to watch is _________________________ and has a rating of____. We are using an alternate schedule on Friday, May 10th so that at 1:30pm we can begin watching our movie. We plan to make connections with the movie selected in an effort to highlight the importance of social emotional learning skills. These skills are incredibly helpful for children and adults. We see them implemented and applied during project based learning and/or STEAM activities. Learning Kids at work (online resource) says,

Social emotional learning (SEL) skills help young children to manage emotions, cooperate with others, understand themselves, and deal with stress. SEL skills are crucial for twenty-first century kids who are involved in project-based learning and need to collaborate and communicate more effectively than they did in the past. Many of the jobs of the future will require SEL skills in order to create solutions for issues such as poverty, pollution, and prosperity. Schools have long ignored SEL skills but have begun to recognize that they may actually be more important than academic skills and that improving social emotional learning skills can often lead directly to improvement in test scores.

Kids typically learn about these skills from their interactions with the world and may model behavior observed in their peers or parents. When others that they respect show these skills, kids are more likely to internalize them and use them on their own. Most kids pick up many SEL skills on their own, but instruction at school, via books, and in specific training can be very helpful.”

While enjoying a movie together and learning more about social emotional learning skills, we will enjoy popcorn compliments of the recent HEB donation to the school. This is happening school wide to end a wonderful week with the students and for staff appreciation. Sharpening the Saw is a great thing!

Please sign below if your child has permission to view the above-mentioned movie. If you decide to not have your child participate, we will ensure they have an alternate activity to complete while they relax with popcorn.

____ Yes, my child has permission to view ______________________________ Rated: ____

____ No, my child does not have permission to view the movie.

Parent Signature: ______________________________________________________________