The Harlem Renaissance

by: Rachel Gunsch

A Return to the African American Culture

An art movement emphasizing the African American culture occurred from 1917-1935 in Harlem. Many artists focused on the life and struggles of African Americans of the time. The realist movement of art revealed the tribulations of the African American people who were suffocating under the oppression of the white population. Jazz, blues, speakeasies, and flappers became prominent ways to express oneself. Pride in the African American race became especially important.
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The Harlem Renaissance

Saturday, Nov. 13th 1920 at 9pm

Harlem, New York, NY, United States

New York, NY

Bring your dancin' shoes and be ready to do wop along with the latest upcoming Jazz musicians of our time. Later enjoy a stunning art gallery focusing on realism and the African American Culture. Enjoy complementary drinks from our local speakeasy that will be hosting a poetry reading event following the art gallery.

My Personal Dreams Deferred

The types of dreams that I have developed determine how they are deferred. Some dreams haven't had the opportunity to take place yet. For example I have a dream of owning my own gallery and becoming a professional artist. It isn't yet obtainable, but I am starting to pave the path for this dream to come true. I have surrounded myself with art, artists, a job in an art gallery, lessons, classes, programs, and practice within my free time. Other dreams I have planned out, but never had the time to take action and carry them out. This is how I react to a dream. I plan, hope, and often prepare to carry out. Dependent on how much the dream means to me will determine if it is put into action or forgotten over time.

Citations

Unknown. The Cotton Club. Digital image. Black History Committee Plans Harlem Renaissance Celebration. Valley Voice, 20 Feb. 2014. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <Valley Voice>.


Reiss, Winold. Drawing in Two Colors. Digital image. A Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials. The Library of Congress, 1 Oct. 2014. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/harlem/harlem.html>.


Johnson, William H. Street Life. Digital image. The Artists' Influences: Why Literature Changed During the Harlem Renaissance. WebQuest, 23 Oct. 2002. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://education.ed.pacificu.edu/sweb/537fri/webquestsj/harlemrenaissance2.html>.


Holsten, Joseph. Rhythm Reunion. Digital image. WetCanvas. F+W, 2014. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://www.wetcanvas.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1296041>.


Tian, Chengxi. Lucid Dream. Digital image. N/a. N/a, n/a. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://society6.com/chengxitian/lucid-dream-yo3_print>.


Unknown. "N/a." N/a. Educational Broadcasting Corporation, n/a. Web. 10 Nov. 2014. <http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pbs.org%2Fwnet%2Fjimcrow%2Fstories_events_harlem.html%20and%20dictionary.com>.


POEM: A PRAYER BY CLAUDE MCKAY. "POEM: A PRAYER BY CLAUDE MCKAY." Poemhunter.com. N/a, 03 Jan. 2003. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/a-prayer-3/>.


Bachlund, Gary. "A Prayer." A Prayer - Text of Claude McKay. N.p., 2009. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <http://www.bachlund.org/A_Prayer.htm>.


McKay, Claude. If We Must Die. Rec. n/a. Unknown, N/a. Internet Archive. Web. 14 Nov. 2014. <https://archive.org/details/ClaudeMckayIfWeMustDie_3>.