Emotion

By: Prad Mishra, Ethan Judd, Reid Zaworski, Alex Gifford

Two Factor Theory

Theories of Emotion

James-Lange: arousal triggers emotions

ex. You see an oncoming car about to hit you, so your heart begins to pound. Therefore, you feel fear.


Cannon-Bard: arousal and emotion are simultaneous

ex. You see an oncoming car about to hit you, so you simultaneously feel fear and begin to have an increased heart rate. One does not cause the other.


Schachter-Singer: arousal and a cognitive label of arousal determine whether or not an emotion is experienced.

ex. You see an oncoming car about to hit you, so your heart beats, and you identify that you're afraid. Therefore, you are experiencing fear.

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Requires physical arousal and a cognitive label of that arousal to be considered emotion

Autonomic Nervous System

Because the 2 factor theory requires physical arousal, the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system play a role in activating this arousal, or slowing arousal down, respectively.


Sympathetic:

With the sympathetic system, pupils dilate, salivation decreases, sweating increases, breathing rate speeds up, heart beat accelerates, and stress hormones are secreted.


Parasympathetic:

The parasympathetic slows all of these down. By creating this arousal in the body, the autonomic nervous system lends one of the factors of the two factor theory of emotion.

Two-Factor Theory Video

Mar 5, 2014

Sources

"Psychology, Third Edition." David G. Myers. 2007, Worth Publishers. Feb 28 2014.