Story of O'O

BY: TY HEEN, Allen Matsumoto, KanoeLehua Ratledge

Po'alua

On tuesday the high schoolers went on a huaka'i to Papa Hana Kuaola where they had the chance to experience how our kupuna made and used an o'o. They engaged in hands on activities where they learned how to make an o'o. When we went into the forest to cut down our o'o we had to ask for permission, then soon after we looked for waiwi (strawberry guava tree). Uncle also told us to look for the waiwi that spoke to us. An interesting fact about waiwi is how it's an invasive plant, but we can use it to forge the land unlike other invasive plants.

How can we use the concepts of Kane to bring pono to our community

We can use the concepts of Kane to bring pono to our community by teaching adults and kids how to make and use an O'O. This helps because we can contribute to helping our culture thrive. We can enlighten them on the many different ways of how our kupuna/ ancestors used mana'o to take care of everyday tasks.
Pule O'o Molokai'i at the Festivals of Aloha Molokai, HI

Group Members

TY HEEN, Kanoelehua Ratledge, Allen Matsumotto