Networks

Different networks and topologies

Ring and Bus Network

Ring Network:

A ring network is a network topology in which each node connects to exactly two other nodes, forming a single continuous pathway for signals through each node - a ring. Data travel from node to node, with each node along the way handling every packet.

Because a ring topology provides only one pathway between any two nodes, ring networks may be disrupted by the failure of a single link.[1] A node failure or cable break might isolate every node attached to the ring. In response, some ring networks add a "counter-rotating ring" (C-Ring) to form a redundant topology: in the event of a break, data are wrapped back onto the complementary ring before reaching the end of the cable, maintaining a path to every node along the resulting C-Ring. Such "dual ring" networks include Spatial Reuse Protocol, Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), and Resilient Packet Ring. 802.5 networks - also known as IBM token ring networks - avoid the weakness of a ring topology altogether: they actually use a star topology at the physical layer and a media access unit (MAU) to imitate a ring at the datalink layer.

Bus Network:

The bus is the data link in a bus network. The bus can only transmit data in one direction, and if any network segment is severed, all network transmission ceases.

A host on a bus network is called a station or workstation. In a bus network, every station receives all network traffic, and the traffic generated by each station has equal transmission priority.[1] Each network segment is, therefore, a collision domain. In order for nodes to transmit on the same cable simultaneously, they use a media access control technology such as carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) or a bus master.