Dracula Project

3rd period - Taylor Nix - Diego Figueroa

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Consuming/Sharing of Blood and Intimacy

In Dracula by Bram Stoker, the consummation and/or giving of blood has an indirect sense of intimacy between the characters.

In the book, the Count doesn’t attempt to drink the blood of Jonathan, one of the main characters, but instead uses him to get to Jonathan’s fiancé, Mina. Count Dracula wants to drink Mina’s blood and turn her into a member of the undead like he is, because she closely resembles the Count’s deceased wife.

Another example of this is when Lucy was in the hospital and received blood transfusions from both Seward and Van Helsing used their own blood to perform transfusions on Lucy and kept it a secret from Arthur, her fiancé. They decided to hide it from him because of how intimate the act of swapping blood was in that time.


-Taylor Nix

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The Role of Religion

In Dracula by Bram Stoker, the author seems to try and influence the reader with Christianity.

While he uses the Count as a satanic, evil being, he also uses crucifixes, rosaries, and other symbols of the Christian religion as objects that ward off all forms of evil and danger that the townspeople believe Dracula is capable of.

When Dracula “turns” one of his victims, such as Lucy and the three women, they seem to physically live forever, but have no soul, which seems to be the inverted version of taking “holy communion” and having eternal spiritual life through drinking the blood of Christ. He may have done this to emphasize the consequences of allowing evil to take over one’s soul when one doesn’t accept the Christian faith.


-Taylor Nix

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Role of Women in the Victorian Era

In Dracula, by Bram Stoker, he shows how women were portrayed and how they were supposed to act to be socially acceptable in the Victorian era through Lucy and Mina. Victorian women only had two options, they were either pure and virgins or they were married and motherly figures. He makes both Mina and Lucy very innocent and loyal to their men to illustrate what women are supposed to be like.

Then when Dracula gets to Lucy and turns her, he uses this to show the opposite of what women were supposed to be like and turns her into a woman defined by her voluptuousness. Furthermore, he shows extreme disapproval of her transformation, when the men decide that killing her is a necessity.

-Diego Figueroa

Female Vampire 11
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Texas' Stereotype

In Dracula, by Bram Stoker, the character Quincey Morris is depicted as a cowboy from Texas and is given little to no attention because of the false reputation that Texas had back in that time. He was just as rich and loved Lucy just as much as all the other guys but was ignored because of where he came from. This shows that stereotypes were a big thing back in the day.


In the end, Quincey proves to be a brave and good-hearted man by not keeping a grudge with Arthur and by sacrificing himself for the better good of everyone. He gives his life to rid the world of the evil Dracula. He shows that he was just as much a man as the rest of Lucy’s suitors. Stoker tries to make people understand that prejudice is bad, by using Quincey as an example.

-Diego Figueroa