Cloning

By: Kaleigh Stagich

What is cloning?

Cloning is when an identical copy of a plant or animal is created from the genetic material of a single organism. There are many viewpoints on this topic and whether it should be allowed to continue with mammals and eventually with humans.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

  • A clone is an identical copy of a plant or animal.
  • There is a great deal of risk that comes with cloning.
  • People have been cloning plants for 1,000's of years.
  • Cloning is a very controversial topic.
  • DNA cloning has been used since the early 1960's.
  • People have used clones for organs that they need to live longer.

PROS

Some of the pros of cloning are:


  • Cloning certain animals may result in higher quality meat, milk, and wool.
  • Cloning can happen naturally (Identical Twins)
  • The FDA has approved cattle, swine, and goat clones are safe, as well as their offspring.
  • There are no unique health risks to animal health compared to naturally created animals.
  • Scientists may eventually be able to clone organs for people who are sick or injured.
  • Scientists may eventually figure out how to clone extinct animals from remnants of their fur or bones.

CONS

Some of the cons of cloning are:



  • Cloning has a history of a great deal of failures.
  • Clones often have health issues.
  • Scientists have found it difficult to produce healthy clones continuously.
  • The techniques of cloning have not yet been perfected.
  • The majority of clones die almost immediately after birth due to developmental issues.
  • Cloning has a greater deal than those that are naturally produced.

STORIES

Snuppy

Cloning animals can be very interesting and exciting, but it usually comes with a price. Snuppy, as seen below is the world's first successful cloned dog. Snuppy gets his name from where he was created which is Seoul National University. Although Snuppy survived, there was a second clone that the scientists tried to create and soon after the puppy was born, it died of pneumonia. With cloning, there have been some successes, but there are still many miscarriages and birth defects that come with cloning.

Dolly

Dolly the sheep is the world's first successfully cloned mammal. She was created by cells taken from an adult sheep. Ian Wilmut and his team of researchers announced Dolly's existence in February 1997. Even though Dolly survived, the team that created her had placed nuclei in 277 eggs, of those, only 29 developed into embryos that could be implanted and of those, only 1 resulted in a live birth. This shows how cloning is not perfected and if they attempt to do this with humans and continue doing it with animals, they would be taking innocent lives.

CONCLUSION

In conclusion, I personally believe that cloning is wrong and should not be allowed to continue in mammals. Cloning causes innocent mammals to die because the techniques have not been perfected. If the mammals end up living, they usually have to live with health issues or birth defects. The innocent mammal has to live its life suffering and although it's hard to say, I believe the animal would be better off if it died because it would be more peaceful and it wouldn't have to live through suffering. Scientists also could eventually use a cloned mammal's organs to make other mammals live longer which is taking away one mammals life to save another. Cloning mammals is wrong and scientists should not be allowed to continue doing it with mammals.

Citations

Works Cited

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Cloned rabbits. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 15 Dec 2015.
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