The Salem Messenger

Salem, Massachusetts 1692

The First Witch is Found

The first witch to be brought to trial was Bridget Bishop. She was an older woman who owned a tavern where many men came to drink cider ale and play shuffle board. She was a critical old woman and didn't pay her bills, this made her the perfect woman to be accused. A man testified at her trial saying that she stole eggs and then turned herself into a cat. Another testified that she came to his bed at night and tormented him. She was even accused of looking at an old house and it falling down. She was given a warrant of death and was hanged at Gallows Hill.

Sickly Betty

During the harsh winter of the year of the witch trials, Betty Parris developed symptoms of a disease called convulsive ergotism. She started diving under furniture in pain, and complaining of fever. The symptoms of this disease included violent fits, a crawling sensation on the skin, vomiting, choking, and hallucinations. It was easy for the people of Salem to believe that this sickness was the devil's doing. The doctors diagnosed her with being a witch since they could not explain her sickness. Many other girls were diagnosed with the sickness as well. It was believed that this mass sickness was all the cause of the devil and that he was within those children. All the young girls were accused of being witches in their trials.

The Perfect Puritan is Actually a Witch!

The devil had infiltrated the very center of the Puritan community, and he did so through Martha Corey. She was an upstanding member of the Puritan congregation, and was respected by many. However, she lost all respect when she showed signs of being a witch.

Martha gave sarcastic responses during her interview for being a witch. This was a true sign that she was guilty of being a witch. She was immediately arrested and her time in court was different than most. Martha's accusers copied her every move. When she bit her lip, they bit theirs as well. She denied all charges, but was then sent to jail later that evening for being guilty of witch craft.

The REAL HISTORY Behind the Salem Witch Trials.

Sources

Works Cited


"An Account of the Salem Witchcraft Investigations, Trials, and Aftermath." An Account of the Salem Witchcraft Investigations, Trials, and Aftermath. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Sept. 2015.


"The Salem Witch Trials, 1692." The Salem Witch Trials, 1692. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Sept. 2015.


"Salem Witch Trials." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 05 Sept. 2015.