Pocahontas

Indian Princess

Early Life

Pocahontas was born in 1595 in Virginia, United States. She had many names, such as Matoaka, Amonute, and her childhood name was Pocahontas. She was the daughter of Chief Powahatan, . When Pocahantas was only 11 or 12 years old, she would go to the market with boys and would do cartwheels, along with the boys she went with. When she did this, she would expose herself. This did not fit with the English ideas of proper behavior.

Getting Invloved

Pocahontas was an Indian Princess, and she was remembered as the first Native woman to marry an Englishman in the North American colonies. She also rescued John Smith, who was going to be executed by her father. But, rather then him being executed, this may have been a tribal ritual which symbolizes his death and rebirth as a member of the tribe.
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Choices & Results

Pocahontas made the decision to save John Smith, who was an explorer, soldier, and an author. Without his journal, we would have no hard evidence that Pocahontas was even real. John played an important role in the establishment of Jamestown, which was the first permanent English settlement in North America. Pocahontas also helped build and establish Jamestown.

In Her Words

There is no evidence of Pocahontas's relationship with John Smith, but historians believe that Pocahontas saved John because she was in love with him. Mosiker wrote that the words ""Were you not afraid to come into my fathers Countrie, and caused feare in him and all his people (but mee), and feare you here I should call you father. I tell you then I will, and you shall call me childe, and so I will bee for ever and ever your Countrieman.... They did tell us alwaies you were dead, and I knew no other till I came to Plimouth." are open to the interpretation that she never would have married John Rolfe had she known John Smith was alive. Therefore, she might have saved him because she was in love with him.

Aftermath

Life changed after Pocahontas and Pocahontas's `actions because had she not prevented her father from killing many colonists, the English might have never colonized North America and many Native cultures might have been preserved from extinction.

Words for Her

A man who was in love with Pocahontas, named John Rolfe. Rolfe carefully considered his position and wrote a lengthy letter to Governor Dale, setting out his desire to marry Pocahontas "for the good of the Plantacon, the honor of or Countrye, for the glorye of God, for myne owne salvacon." Governor Dale approved; so, when he was contacted, did Powhatan. The couple was married at Jamestown in April of 1614. Their marriage began the Peace of Pocahontas--a friendship between the English and Powhatan tribes that lasted for many years.

William Strachey, a Jamestown resident and official secretary and historian for the colony, called her "a well featured but wanton young girle".

John Smith said, "at the minute of my execution," he declared, Pocahontas "...hazarded the beating out of her own braines to save mine."

Legacy

Pocahontas's choices was the reason the Virginia Colony didn't disappear, and if she hadn't done that, there wouldn't be a Virginia today. Pocahontas was the reason many colonists in the colony didn't die. Pocahontas was a leader, a princess, and a savior.

Later Life

Pocahontas was prisoner to Captain Samuel Argall when visiting the village of the Potomac, Indians because they wanted her tribe to release some Englishmen they had taken hostage. She was taken to Jamestown, where she was courtesy by the governor , Sir Thomas Dale. She was introduced to the Christain religion, where she was baptized and took the new name of Rebecca. John Rolfe fell in love with her and they got married, and has a child. Their marriage brought peace to the Native Americans and Englishmen 8 years of peaceful relations. In Gravesend, she developed a case of smallpox and died at age 22 in 1617.

Annotated Bibliography

  • "An illustration from John Smiths General History depicts Pocahontas saving him from execution at..." UXL Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes. Ed. Laurie J. Edwards. 3rd ed. Vol. 1: Northeast, Subartic. Detroit: UXL, 2012. Opposing Viewpoints In Context. Web. 9 May 2016. This picture shows Pocahontas saving John Smith from what she thought was an execution. I got this off of Gale's website.
  • "Pocahontas (1595-1617)." Gale Biography in Context. Detroit: Gale, 2010. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 9 May 2016. This is a biography about Pocahontas and her purpose and what she did throughout history. This was one of my main sources which contained a lot of information.
  • "An illustration from John Smiths General History depicts Pocahontas saving him from execution at..." UXL Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes. This encyclopedia explains the native American tribes and what they did and their rituals.
  • "Pocahontas." Notable Native Americans. Gale, 1995. Biography in Context. Web. 4 May 2016. This book is about all the Native American people who made an impact on society.

  • "Pocahontas." Colonial America Reference Library. Ed. Peggy Saari and Julie L. Carnagie. Vol. 4: Biographies: Volume 2. Detroit: UXL, 2000. 257-265. U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 May 2016. This was a book with the colonial time and the main historians.

  • "Pocahontas." Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1936. Gale Biography In Context. Web. 10 May 2016. This dictionary just explained the historical figures and their purpose for society.

  • "Pocahontas Saves John Smith: 1607." Global Events: Milestone Events Throughout History. Ed. Jennifer Stock. Vol. 6: North America. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale, 2014. U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 May 2016. This short story just explained and focused on the event of when Pocahontas saved john Smith.

  • "Pocahontas." UXL Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Vol. 6. Detroit: UXL, 2009. 1241-1242. U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 May 2016. This encyclopedia was for all of US history, and it was a great reference for quotes from and for her.

  • "Native American Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, trying to prevent her father from having the..." UXL Encyclopedia of U.S. History. Sonia Benson, Daniel E. Brannen, Jr., and Rebecca Valentine. Vol. 7. Detroit: UXL, 2009. U.S. History In Context. Web. 10 May 2016. This encyclopedia was another encyclopedia for US history, which was really a big source for this project.

  • Perdue, Theda. "Columbus meets Pocahontas in the American South." Southern Cultures 3.1 (1997): 4+. Student Edition. Web. 10 May 2016. This was a journal that was written by Theda Perdue which was about when Pocahontas traveled and was captured.

  • Clausen, Christopher. "Between two worlds: the familiar story of Pocahontas was mirrored by that of a young Englishman given as a hostage to her father." The American Scholar 76.3 (2007): 80+. Student Edition. Web. 10 May 2016. This was another journal written by Christopher Clausen which contained some information from John Smiths journal and encounters and included it into his journal.