New York

Trading Hands. . . from the Dutch to the English

Wall or Wall Street?

Wall Street has not always been a central hub of the world's finances, as we know it today; it was actually once just a wall marking the boundaries of a Manhattan settlement. Who knew that a literal wall would be the foundation for the terminology we currently associate with the world's financial industry?



Research taken from Of the People

Image: http://www.city-data.com/forum/politics-other-controversies/893087-did-you-know-honor-african-american.html

We can work out all the kinks, right?

We observed the Dutch as being our biggest rival in trade – particularly the slave trade – and our nation decided it was time for action. Our primary move was on New Netherland which we would rename New York. James, the Duke of York, was able to acquire and distribute the land we currently inhabited by persuading his older brother, Charles. Unfortunately, we had to share our conquered colony with the Dutch who currently populated it. Also, the government struggled in their attempts to please both of our parties. Though the Dutch were entitled to religious freedom, our new government would fail in their overemphasis on feudal land policies and the ability to attain a self-governed colony. This lack of self-government caused us difficulties in effectively raising the necessary funds that were an obligatory part of James returns. Soon, however, James gave into our desires and granted us an elective assembly. At our first meeting we passed a “Charter of Libertyes and Privileges”; however, James did not approve. James’ decision was based upon the fact that our young colony would give too many rights to our colonists and that we might challenge the Parliament’s power. This declination would ultimately leave our colony in internal chaos resulting in slow growth, political instability, and internal conflict.


Research taken from Of the People

Image: http://www.sonofthesouth.net/revolutionary-war/colonies/new-york.htm