Forbidden Love

The Life of Richard & Mildred Loving

Background

In the area around Central Point, Virginia, where blacks and whites mixed freely with little racial tension even at the height of the Jim Crow era. Mildred became a reluctant activist in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s when she and her husband, Richard Loving, successfully challenged Virginia's ban on interracial marriage. (Biography.com)
Big image

Breaking the Law

In Virginia they have a law known as anti-miscegenation law (Virginia Racial Integrity Act)

which barred the Loving's from marrying in their home state, so the couple drove 90 miles north to Washington, D.C. to tie the knot and then returned to their home in Caroline County, Virginia. (Biography.com) They were married a couple of weeks, and the county sheriff and two deputies stormed in their bedroom and were questioning them, but they showed them their marriage certificate. But Richard spent the night in jail, and the couple violated eventually pleaded guilty to violating the Virginia law. "Almighty God created the races white, white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents,"(biography.com) this explains how The judge is saying that God created different races so that they won’t be assorted. Judge Leon M. Bazile ruled “And but for the interference with his arrangement there would be no cause for such marriages. This shows that the judge doesn't agree with biracial marriages.

They're taking a stand

In 1963 they decided it´s time to take a stand. The Civil Rights movement was blossoming into real change in America and with a sense. And the Loving's were just fed up and was looking for a change that might lead the Loving's back to their old lives. ACLU lawyers, Bernard S. Cohen and Philip J. Hirschkop, appealed the Lovings' case to the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals arguing the Virginia law ran counter to the Equal Protection Clause of the 14 Amendment. (Biography.com) Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote the opinion for the Court stating marriage is a basic civil right and to deny this right on a basis of race is “directly subversive of the principle of equality at the heart of the Fourteenth Amendment” this deprives all the citizens from liberty without due process of law. Richard Loving had an Simple argument: (biography.com)

"Tell the court I love my wife, and it is just unfair that I can't live with her in Virginia." this shows how unfair it is that you cannot be with the person you love based on the color of their skin.

Big image
Big image

Works Cited

Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, n.d


"Is." Washington Post. The Washington Post, n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2016.